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Jewellery Photography


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#1 Khalid

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 03:01 PM

Dear Friends,

I have a new project i.e. Photgraphing jewelleries......

Now the question is.....

How to obtain softness and glitters i.e. in the diamonds while photographing to make the photographs look natural......


Please send me your suggestions on this....
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 03:14 PM

I heard that a technic is to do two shots for each view : one for the average values and one for the highlights, reflections (underexposed). Then make a composite with photoshop.

EDIT : thought you were talking about still photography, not sure if it is actually the case...
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 03:21 PM

Star filters is the common cliche method, but net diffusion instead (like using ultra-sheer black pantyhose) can create a more subtle cross-star effect from the glints, or even "scratch" filters (clear filters that are scuffed & abraded lightly to create odd flares). Tiffen once made some oddball scratch/etched filters that created abstract glints ("Hollywood Star" was one of them, I recall.)

You need sort of "pin" lighting -- sharp spotlights, like from a Dedolight -- at the right angle to get a good kick. Rotating the diamond slowly during the helps create an interactive flare & ever-changing glint.
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#4 Khalid

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 04:20 PM

I was just browsing on and I had come across a site called table top studio which had details of photographing coins, jewellery and so on they reccomend to use a LED lamp for the sparkling and glittering effects in te diamonds......
Suggest me on this..................
See attachment of the LED Lamp.....

Thanks to all....

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 06:59 PM

they reccomend to use a LED lamp for the sparkling and glittering effects in te diamonds......


Yes, I can see the advantages of that; lots of little bright sources increases the chances for multiple kicks off of the diamond's surface.
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#6 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 08:40 PM

A ring light helps get the best kicks into the lens. Try an LED ring light. I have used rope lights around the lens as well.


Kevin Zanit
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#7 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 07:52 AM

walk into any swarovski crystal shop and see how they light with multiple bright tiny spots - as mentioned above

thanks

Rolfe
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#8 Matt Wicker

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 11:01 AM

Wow!

A topic I can actually contribute to, I am a complete newbie to the moving image hence me being in lurk mode most of the time. However stills is my bag, jewellery needs a mix of hard and soft light so the usual way is light with a very hard light source and then surround the object with as many plain white reflector boards as you can squeeze in. If you can get your'e boards in close enough and have your'e hard light a reasonable distance away the good old inverse square law will work in your'e favour and negate the need for too many extra lights. Buy some cheap plexiglass mirror tiles, cut them up and place liberally around for added sparkle.


Good Luck
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 11:43 AM

Nice work.

Most metals are lit by reflecting white over the surface. Some jewels too, but to see the color of a ruby or get a glint off of the facets of a diamond, you need a sharper spotlight, hence why it's a mix.
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#10 Matt Wicker

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 12:52 PM

Thanks David,

Not one of my best, but it was to hand to illustrate a point. Still not quite sure when to chirp up with posts, as technically I'm still just one of those static image people!!! but I have been shoving lights about for the last twenty years so hopefully you guys won't maul Me too much :)
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