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Digi transfers with a J/K optical printer?


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#1 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 02:27 PM

Check this out- http://www.jkcamera.com/.I used the JK for 16/16 step printing and 16 to S8 reduction as well as blow up to 16 from S8.It should work well for S8 to digi,just replace the film camera head with a digi camera.I'm wondering how it would compare to the Workprinter.Same principal,do you suppose it would be better?
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 03:17 PM

That's probably how I would try to do it.
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#3 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 01:38 PM

That's probably how I would try to do it.



What program would you use to animate the individual frames to 24 fps?I'm assuming you would have to repeat every 4th frame for NTSC?
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#4 Robert Hughes

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 01:53 PM

One possible solution: you could store the individual frames as GIF files and use AVISynth or VirtualDub to combine them into an AVI file.
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#5 Ian Marks

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 01:53 PM

A numbered series of pictures can be pulled into a Adobe After Effects where it becomes a footage clip like any other. For NTSC, you can work in a 24 fps composition and add 3:2 pulldown at the output stage - no big deal. You can also use this program to stabilize jittery footage, within limits.
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#6 Brant Collins

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 02:51 PM

You can import stills in FCP also. In the prefrences choose still duration to 1 rams and drag them on the time line . much like you would in Aftee Effects
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#7 Robert Hughes

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 03:39 PM

I'd like to know if a JK optical printer could be fitted with a medium format digital back such as a PhaseOne P25?

http://www.phaseone....atasheet_us.pdf

A 4K film scanner in your workroom! Too bad the back alone is about $25,000. But that would be about the ultimate conversion device. Start saving those pennies... :D

Edited by Robert Hughes, 05 February 2006 - 03:43 PM.

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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 04:44 PM

Hi,

I tried shooting some frames of 35mm print with a DSLR back during the new year break, and made a few illustrative mistakes:

- Focus is extremely critical. The problem was that it wasn't being properly clamped in a gate, so the tendency of it to curve was messing things up.

- Don't shoot through the base (d'oh); ensure you're seeing a mirrored, inverted image. Complete inability to get the frame in focus while the fluff on the sprocket holes sharpens up fine is a fairly solid hint here...

- The Canon 60mm EF-S lens I was using wouldn't quite get tight enough on a 35mm frame - I could see the next and previous frames. Usually you would expect to see soundtrack and sprockets as the DSLR frame is wider than 4 perf Academy. This does have fairly disturbing implications for people wanting to shoot off a super-8 frame or looking to fill the DSLR frame width with a 1.85:1 film image. You'd certainly need extension tubes and specialist macro lenses.

- Using a very distant (large and therefore diffuse and very out-of-focus) illuminated backdrop works nicely, and yes, diffuse light does help hide scratches.

I think this could probably be made to work OK, but you'd have to drop a few thousand on machining. Software is easy.

Phil
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Willys Widgets

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Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Ritter Battery