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best mic for best price


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#1 Sean Curt

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 03:41 PM

Hey hows it going here Im getting into videography and wanted to know what is a quality and not so expensive lapel wireless microphone that I can get...I'll be out on the streets talking with people and I dont want to use a boom-mic for this or a handheld mic either

Now,
as far as my interviews that may take place indoors, I wouldnt mind using a boom-mic,(i read that ribbon mics are good,these are the ones used for voice overs which I will be doing as well) I wanted to know if any of you have experience with different mics, and any professionals...that deal with mic's are welcome to give their suggestions

anyone heard of www.zzonunds.com they appear to have good mics for low prices

Edited by Sean Curt, 01 February 2006 - 03:45 PM.

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#2 Gordon Highland

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 07:11 PM

I think you should consider reversing that logic. Lavaliers are usually poor choices outdoors "on the street." Most of them are omnidirectional and will pick up all kinds of stuff you don't want (they can work ok with some high-end gear and a pro with good miking technique). You can often get away with lavs a lot more indoors. Outdoors is where you'll usually want/need a boom with a shotgun microphone (narrow pickup pattern) to better isolate the voice from the cacophony of other sounds going on.

I've bought lots of stuff from zzounds without problem.
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#3 Sean Curt

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 08:31 AM

I think you should consider reversing that logic. Lavaliers are usually poor choices outdoors "on the street." Most of them are omnidirectional and will pick up all kinds of stuff you don't want (they can work ok with some high-end gear and a pro with good miking technique). You can often get away with lavs a lot more indoors. Outdoors is where you'll usually want/need a boom with a shotgun microphone (narrow pickup pattern) to better isolate the voice from the cacophony of other sounds going on.

I've bought lots of stuff from zzounds without problem.

only reason why I was considering a lavalier is because as Im talking with the person, I want their honest opinion about a topic so I dont wanna walk up to them with a handheld mic and then get an answer that they think is what others will wont to hear, or answer it in a not so honest way cause they are being recorded.

the cam's will be out of sight. its just gettng the audio setup to something thats not so obvious.... now that we understand why I cant use a handheld..any ideas?

I also seen a this Audio-Technica ATW601L for 249.95 anyone know of that one or the AKG WMS40/407?......do these wireless setups require a wall plug or is it a given that all wireless mic combo's have some type of portable setup option incase a person is not near a socket?

Edited by Sean Curt, 02 February 2006 - 08:35 AM.

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#4 Gordon Highland

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 09:47 PM

so were YOU going to wear the lavalier and just stand close to them? that won't sound very good, barely usable. if your camera is hidden, you want a long supercardioid shotgun mic planted somewhere, but you need someone there to be sure it's pointed DIRECTLY at them. the wireless systems for video use run on batteries, both transmitter and receiver. the ones for musician or house-sound use, the receivers run on wall power. you could still use those if you have somewhere to plug it in nearby. if you were gonna put the lavalier on the subject, that's far more intrusive than using a boom mic. if this is for any possible public consumption whatsoever, you're going to need that person to sign a release anyway, so they're gonna know they're being recorded. . .

Both of those systems appear to run on DC power, so not ideal for this application unless near an outlet. UHF is a good thing, and you'd be wise to get one that has diversity. i still cannot recommend a lav for this application.
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#5 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 09:57 PM

Is this some hidden camera marketing survey video? I have been offered to do one of those before, where you go to a competitors store and asks peoples opinions on the clients store. All while filming them secretly with a hidden camera. Kinda distasteful IMHO.
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#6 MILLONPHOTO

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 10:16 PM

What everyone is saying is: you don't use a lav out doors. All of their reasons are correct. A lav WILL pick up sounds from across the street. Use a boom or hand held for talent. You can wear one - but you will pick up your jacket, a hand or other parts of clothing. I do a ton of ENG for news show and the worst thing you want to do is bring back bad, unusable audio with a great clip. ;)

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#7 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 07:16 AM

I Just recently purchased a Rode NTG2 shotgun mic. Its being used by a growing number of news crews to shoot news both hand held and on a boom as it is great value for money. Has a large number of accesories including the equivalent to softies, boom poles, pistol grips, shockmounts etc. All very affordable.
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#8 jazzology101

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 03:03 PM

Just wear the lav a little further from your mouth... that way you will not be too much louder than the person you are talking to... I don't know where these other posters are coming from as the networks have been doing this very thing for years... just remember if you cannot hear the person the microphone will not either. Some common brands and models include the Sanken COS-11, Countryman EMW and B6 (these are more expensive) some cheaper mics in common use include the Tram, PSC millimic, Sennheiser MKE-2 and many more. just make sure whatever you use it is an omni and not a directional pickup pattern mic.

good luck!
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#9 Sean Curt

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 04:14 AM

Gordon:

Thanks for the information, So you'd recommned i use a long supercardioid shotgun mic planted on the cam
and have somenone monitor the direction the mic is pointed at which is what I had in mind I just figured that the lavalier would be better but I'll start looking at "long supercardioid shotgun" mics....

But my next question is this
lets say Im in the mall, and my camera guy is on the other side of the mall(out of sight of the person to be interviewed) but you know how the malls are they have noise coming from everywhere,....how would u tackle this as far as audio goes.... I have a GL2 which I'll try to keep within 20-25 feet so the footage will be good but Im just baffled about getting exceptional sound.... ( I notice Ashton Kutcher from the show "Punked" has good audio he's the example of the Reality show I have in mind except Im not Punking anyone.

now as far as the release forms go, I dont think there is gonna be a problem for the people to sign the forms so what I'll do is after they've been filmed I'll tell them that they were being recorded (actually video taped). I will asked them then to sign the release forms which I dont think will be a big problem.

But let me explore this with you a bit more in addition to our discussion about sound. where can I read more on this policy?, and as far as filming goes, is videotaping consider the same as filming, because if its not then maybe I can get away with not having to ask for release forms if videotaping has different policies than filming.
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#10 Brian Wells

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 11:51 PM

lets say Im in the mall, and my camera guy is on the other side of the mall(out of sight of the person to be interviewed) but you know how the malls are...

Good luck getting permission to film/video in the mall. If you are able to shoot there, then personally I would go with lav's instead of a boom.

maybe I can get away with not having to ask for release forms if videotaping has different policies than filming.

Standard protocol on reality shows is a signed release AND a Polaroid of the person you are recording. Sometimes crews will use iZone sticky film and attach the picture onto the release permanently so they don't become separated.
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#11 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 03:08 AM

Please don't piss off the people in the malls, you are likely to encounter some real attitude when they find out you are secretly filming them. What you are doing could likely burn future opurtunities for other film makers trying to get legit footage in malls.

The mall will probably kick you out anyways, most don't allow cameras inside without approval. Even though I don't agree with that policy its not going to help matters secretly filming interviews.
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#12 Andrew Koch

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 07:18 AM

Hi Sean,

When filming/videotaping, photographing, recording, etc, make sure you have done your homework about the legality of your shoot. Make sure you follow all protocol. If you are in a large city, especially in LA, you will have to get permits. In los angeles, you have to get a permit even to shoot in your own home (I have experienced this issue first hand). I am also a student and have had to deal with all sorts of challenges with shooting in public. I have found in Los Angeles that many people are hostile toward people, especially students shooting in public. I have had people threaten to shut several productions I worked on down. And we had permits, permission, and were quiet, appreciative and respectful. If people are going to have this kind of negative reaction to legitimate shoots, imagine how they will react to something that has no permission and violates someone's privacy. What city are you shooting in? Most of the lousy additudes from people about filming stems from bad experiences they have had with filmmakers behaving badly/disrespectfully. Some crews don't respect locations, leaving trash around, breaking things, being noisy, so the owners of a place will decide to never ever let anyone shoot there again. Please don't do anything that will make the struggle of filmmaking worse for all of us.

What exactly is your project? Perhaps some people on this website can give you some advice on how to do your film in a way that won't create problems for you or other filmmakers.
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#13 Sean Curt

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:00 PM

it must suck for some....
hehe I just researched my state's permit requirements..and it says

Film Permit is not required for individuals filming or video taping only for their own personal or private use, for employees of print or electronic news media when filming on-going news events, or for students and faculty filming exclusively for educational purposes
I fit both of those

so Im glad now...and I can say that its best to know what you are talking about before saying it...everyone is crying out with their "please dont do this!" and "please dont do that",in the forum and just seem filled with discouraging words good thing I was warned of your kind, I dont listen to that type and I actually see for myself,
......seems like some people just dont want to see others excel
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#14 Gordon Highland

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:28 PM

its best to know what you are talking about before saying it...

i can only assume you're referring to yourself here. . . a little bit more info about the nature of your project would've been helpful up front and saved all this dancing around the subject.

you have to understand that most of the folks on this forum are professionals. we've experienced these things, and are sharing that with you, and assume that your aspirations are professional as well, not home movies. no one is trying to knock you down, but that attitude won't get you far here, nor in this business. even though you may be playing the "student" card or "personal use," that has nothing to do with private property. 90% of malls (and most other buildings) are not going to let you shoot there, regardless of purpose. nor does it trump peoples' basic right to privacy. i've personally been stopped twice in mall parking lots simply carrying a handycam and been turned away before i could ever enter the building! these days people are scared to death about liability. afraid you're going to capture someone screwing up and use it against them, etc.
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#15 Brian Wells

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:46 PM

hehe I just researched my state's permit requirements..and it says blah, blah, blah

You're funny! The mall is not public property!
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#16 David Sweetman

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:49 PM

......seems like some people just dont want to see others excel


Where the heck did that come from? He was trying to help you out.

What's wrong with you kids? And why can't you spell?

Anyway, I'd bet ten-to-one the mall won't let you shoot there. I'm not trying to stop you from succeeding; I have been removed from a few malls myself, and as Gordon says, it isn't the permit thing so much as the private property thing that will prohibit you from shooting there. But go ahead and give it a shot, what the heck.
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#17 Sean Curt

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 05:11 AM

You're funny! The mall is not public property!

and even if its not...who cares..Im gonna take my camera and we going FILMING!!!!
YEAAAAA!!!!

and maybe you were too wide open(attracting to much attention) when you filmed your footage...

Edited by Sean Curt, 10 February 2006 - 05:15 AM.

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#18 Andrew Koch

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 05:14 AM

"it must suck for some....
hehe I just researched my state's permit requirements"..



I'm glad you did the research. It sounds like your state's permit laws are much more lenient than the ones in Los Angeles? What state are you shooting in?

"its best to know what you are talking about before saying it..."

I told you what the situation is like in Los Angeles, which I know from research and personal experience. Then I asked you what city you were in? I never pretended to know what your state's permit laws are, that's why I asked (did you check your local city permit laws as well, some cities have their own rules in addition to the state). I think it is quite unfair of you to make this comment when I am simply trying to provide you with information.

" ......seems like some people just dont want to see others excel"

Why would you say that when the whole point of this forum is to help people excell. The only reason I wrote to you was to give you information that you could use.


"and maybe you were too wide open(attracting to much attention) when you filmed your footage..."


I wasn't trying to sneak in a camera or grab stuff without permission, so yes, people were aware that I was filming, which was fine because I had permits and pemission to be there. It's hard to hide an entire film crew, even if a very small one. I would get resistence becuase people assumed that since I was a student I didn't have permits. (Students get a bad reputation because of disregard for the local laws), Once I proved to them that I was legit, they left me alone. Since you are a student, you may want to ask your school about how they feel about your shoot? They may be of some help. Would this be the type of project that they would approve of? Remember, you are also representing your school when you go out and make a student film. If the security guard at the mall asks you what school you are with and you mention the name, would the school consider it a poor representation of them or would they support you?

In the future, could you please be a little more respectful with your posts.
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