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Low speed film dusk


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#1 filmguy

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 12:27 AM

I am planning on shooting a super 16mm film project and really wanted to shoot with Fuji Daylight 64ASA. Will I be able to use this film on a beach in the late afternoon/ early evening when the sun begins to set? Will I have enough light for a short time? On the other hand if I use a medium daylight stock 250 ASA in the bright sun will this be problematic. I want to stick with one stock. I wasn't planning on using a filter in either case.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 01:30 AM

I am planning on shooting a super 16mm film project and really wanted to shoot with Fuji Daylight 64ASA. Will I be able to use this film on a beach in the late afternoon/ early evening when the sun begins to set? Will I have enough light for a short time? On the other hand if I use a medium daylight stock 250 ASA in the bright sun will this be problematic. I want to stick with one stock. I wasn't planning on using a filter in either case.


You can keep using a 64D stock at sunset into dusk IF you start to shoot more silhouette against the sunset/dusk sky and not expose for the ground. But if you need to expose for the ground into late dusk, you need to switch to 250D.

What's so wrong about carrying one roll of 250D and have that loaded in a mag on standby when it gets dark? If you have a lot of sunny scenes, it would be odd to pick a stock just for a few shots at dusk.

On the other hand, I'm sure that the new Fuji F-250D Eterna ('63 I think) is close in grain to the old F-64D ('22), so perhaps in that case, you might as well use the new 250D for everything. But not the old 250D ('62).
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#3 Filip Plesha

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 05:41 AM

I've been getting magic hour photos (after sunset) at f2.8-f1.8

The rule of a thumb for the moment after the sun sets (the begining of magic hour) is 1/film speed seconds of exposure and f2.8. After a few minutes it takes f2, then f1.8 etc.
And I'm talking about exposing for the ground.
Since the exposure in your case is 1/48s you can use 64ISO film with these apertures, and still get
a third of a stop advantage.

Depending on real world elements, you might need a stop more than the rule says, but either way, you can do it with 64T and a fast lense (at least f2)
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 08:41 AM

The same would apply when using the Kodak VISION2 50D and 250D Color Negative Films 7201 and 7205. If you have the light, the 7201 offers the finest grain of any color negative film on the market. Yet the 7205 has remarkably good grain and sharpness for a film of its speed. Remember, the 7205 has plenty of latitude to allow some overexposure, and as you overexpose, you get finer grain (but not as fine as 7201), more shadow detail and "richer" blacks. Of course you don't want to overexpose to the extent that the negatives are so dense that they are outside the range of normal printing and transfer.
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