Jump to content


Photo

Theatre technicians


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 03 February 2006 - 02:13 AM

Hi,

Any impressions on the skill-set crossover with theatre technicians (electrics, mechanist etc...) compared to the grip/gaffer/camera depts in film ?

How about work ethic ?

Any good or bad examples of/from people who have worked in both industries ?


I myself found it interesting to watch from a theatre perspective the filming of the theatre scene in King Kong last year (we worked on for Big Primate as hired help in our own theatre) ...

Film worked on a much faster pace (gear flying out of the trucks) - not sure if that is indicative of the majority of the rest of the industry tho

any other opinions ?

cheers,
nick

Edited by Nick Mulder, 03 February 2006 - 02:17 AM.

  • 0

#2 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 February 2006 - 07:01 AM

I know a few people in design and set construction who work in film, TV and theatre. There are also some electricians started out in theatre. The main difference is the faster changes and re-rigging, a big setup might only be up for a matter of hours. They'll have to learn the different techniques, so there'll be some training required and building up of experience. Some make up artists do both as well.

Also, quite a few directors & producers started out in theatre.
  • 0

#3 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 03 February 2006 - 12:31 PM

A theatre background can be very useful in film but film is very different.

Basically dimmer systems, DMX controlled lighting, rigging, and leko knlowledge can be a great advantage.
especially if you are familiar with Whole Hog systems.

But filmmaking is very differnet than stage. Like weather. One has to be prepared for extreme heat, extreme cold rain snow etc, etc.

Working with HMI's, rigging cars and other lighting typically not found on a stage.

The other most important thing is learning to be quiet and sensitive to the process while working around the actors and directors doing the DP and gaffers bidding.

All in all, I recommend doing it and improving your skill sets.

Best

Tim
  • 0

#4 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 03 February 2006 - 05:16 PM

All in all, I recommend doing it and improving your skill sets.

Best

Tim



I've worked mostly in the sound and AV departments - but have since moved on to working with the mechanists who are for those who dont know are in some ways similar to grips (but not exactly) duties incl. set building, rigging, flying, yer typical professional stage-hand...

I should really poke my nose back into the electrics office and get involved in lighting -

interestingly enough (for me) I am doing a stock-take of all the lighting departments gear - I will have found and filled out a form of info for every item worth over ~ $100 USD which cant hurt in terms of learning at least what there is to play with ...
  • 0


Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

CineTape

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineLab

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

CineTape

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC