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Wes Anderson! Robert Yeoman!


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#1 jijhh

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 08:54 PM

Can anyone venture a guess as to how fast the highest frame rate is in one of their classic ending shots?

Andrew
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#2 Matt Irwin

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 06:55 PM

Are you referring to the speed ramp at the end of Bottle Rocket? It's been a while since I've seen it, but I'd guess around 48fps.
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#3 jijhh

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 06:55 PM

there's one at the end of every wes film (dancing in rushmore, cemetary in royal ten, etc.) . it seems to be more overcranked than 48 to me though.

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#4 Brian Wells

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 07:18 PM

Can anyone venture a guess as to how fast the highest frame rate is in one of their classic ending shots?

Probably 96 or 120fps.
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#5 brandonanderson

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 01:32 PM

hey phillyfilm. Im not too sure of ur question because I'm only 15 but I wanted to comment on the fact I am close to philly and a Wes Anderson worshipper.


Whereabouts you from?

(I am aspiring to be a director/cinematographer)
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#6 Patrick Neary

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 06:35 PM

Hey-

I looked at these very scenes awhile back with a director as reference for another project, on a dvd player with exact 2x, 4x, etc speed control. At 2x (assuming some accuracy from the player) they played normally which suggests they ramped to 48fps (this was the end of Tennenbaums). Just eyeballing it, it certainly wasn't faster than 72fps.
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#7 Keith Mottram

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 03:15 PM

I'd need to look at it again but I'm pretty sure that the ramp at the end of Life Aquatic used a certain amout of digital slow-mo. There are a number of shots in that film that were slowed digitally, but I think the final shot is a combination.

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#8 jijhh

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 04:57 PM

I'd need to look at it again but I'm pretty sure that the ramp at the end of Life Aquatic used a certain amout of digital slow-mo. There are a number of shots in that film that were slowed digitally, but I think the final shot is a combination.

keith


the shot where bill murray walks up to the front of the ship after meeting his son is digital slow mo but if i remember correctly the last shot walking down the stairs is not. i could be misremembering though.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 09:46 PM

the shot where bill murray walks up to the front of the ship after meeting his son is digital slow mo but if i remember correctly the last shot walking down the stairs is not. i could be misremembering though.



It was both -- a high-speed shot further slowed in post. You can see some frame blending if you look.
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#10 Jeremy

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 10:03 AM

The last shot of Life Aquatic was a very bad digital slow-mo, if I remember right. I really didn't like the movie as a whole... with the one exception of the light meter readings always being about 5.6 no matter what the lighting condition, which probably goes to show what a nerd I am.
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