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Panasonic 30fps. vs. Sony 30fps.


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#1 jamiedocgirl

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 11:39 AM

Hello All,

I in a bit of a quandary:

I have shot over 120 hours of a documentary on a Sony PD100A.
My camera was stolen a few months back, and I need to get a new camera to finish the documentary.

I am being pushed (in a good way) to buy the new DVX-100B, as opposed to the Sony PD170, or 150.

I was given the advice to keep shooting 30fps., as to not mess to much with the frame rate.

I was wondering how they would compare ? the Sony and Panasonic? The film finishing place said they prefer the Panasonic, but it?s a tough call.

I don?t want the new footage to stick out dramatically, because I don?t know where I will edit to ? though I do the like the idea of having the option of 24fps., I am not sure if I will ever use it.

I also worry about low light, but if I can have some great shots, why not?

Any advice?

Thanks,
Jamie
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:03 PM

If you've been shooting 60i on the PD100, you can just shoot 60i mode on the DVX100 instead of 24P or 30P, so there will be no matching problems (other than the fact that the DVX100 images may look a little nicer.)

The advantage to the DVX100 is that you have the option to shoot either way, interlaced-scan or progressive-scan. The only advantage to the PD170 is that it may be more sensitive in low-light conditions; otherwise, I'd get the DVX100.
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#3 jamiedocgirl

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:14 PM

If you've been shooting 60i on the PD100, you can just shoot 60i mode on the DVX100 instead of 24P or 30P, so there will be no matching problems (other than the fact that the DVX100 images may look a little nicer.)

The advantage to the DVX100 is that you have the option to shoot either way, interlaced-scan or progressive-scan. The only advantage to the PD170 is that it may be more sensitive in low-light conditions; otherwise, I'd get the DVX100.


Thank you David!
One of my concerns -- is when I see posts like this thread (http://www.cinematog...?showtopic=6256)

"Sony cameras render color so differently it's all but impossible to cut different cameras seamlessly, even after an extensive color correction. I've done many shoots with my XL1s and an additional PD-150/170 and they almost never match up. So what I end up doing is going for a different style with the other camera. A style that doesn't conflict, mind you, but works differently in terms of framing and often information. If it's not going to match up, don't try and make it match up."

I'm worried because this is a documentary, and though I would like to use a good camera, I don't want all my other footage to not match up well. If it looks a little better - great!, but if it looks totally different, then maybe I should stick with Sony?

Thanks again for your time,
Jamie
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#4 Matt Frank

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:17 PM

I know this isnt the right board but if you are looking to get a PD-150 I have been thinking about selling mine. I have the Sony Wide Angle Lens (Zoom Through) a 10 hour battery, the stock battery and memory stick, an Azden SGM-30 Shotgun Mic (was dropped leaving a dent but still sounds great) with mount, 2 XLR Cables, and all the manuals and I was hoping to get around 1800 for all of it.

Posted Image

Edited by Matt Frank, 08 February 2006 - 12:20 PM.

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:23 PM

Well, you don't want to necessarily match everything to the lowest common denominator either, otherwise just keep using the PD100!

Sure, Sony cameras are balanced a little more on the warm side but I suspect you already have more variations in color in your 120 hours of footage anyway. It's a documentary, afterall. But if you're really worried and you don't need progressive-scan, then get the PD170.

The Panasonic camera has fairly good color controls; there's a red chroma boost called "Cine-Like Chroma" that may be closer to the Sony look.
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#6 jamiedocgirl

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:32 PM

Well, you don't want to necessarily match everything to the lowest common denominator either, otherwise just keep using the PD100!

Sure, Sony cameras are balanced a little more on the warm side but I suspect you already have more variations in color in your 120 hours of footage anyway. It's a documentary, afterall. But if you're really worried and you don't need progressive-scan, then get the PD170.

The Panasonic camera has fairly good color controls; there's a red chroma boost called "Cine-Like Chroma" that may be closer to the Sony look.


Thanks again David. Well...I think I instinctively feel that it's almost pointless to get the PD100A - to put money into something is older -- I def. want it to look great, but my fear was that it would make the majority of the footage (which is mostly shot with the 100A) look bad.

There is also the learning curve. I know Sony. I wasn't a filmmaker - I was an actress, but an extraordinary event occurred, and now I'm almost 3 years into it.

Do you think the 170 will look better than the 100A, but still match more than the DVX100?
Is the learning curve high with the Panasonic?

Thanks so much,
Jamie
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#7 Matt Frank

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 02:11 PM

Thanks again David. Well...I think I instinctively feel that it's almost pointless to get the PD100A - to put money into something is older -- I def. want it to look great, but my fear was that it would make the majority of the footage (which is mostly shot with the 100A) look bad.

There is also the learning curve. I know Sony. I wasn't a filmmaker - I was an actress, but an extraordinary event occurred, and now I'm almost 3 years into it.

Do you think the 170 will look better than the 100A, but still match more than the DVX100?
Is the learning curve high with the Panasonic?

Thanks so much,
Jamie



The learning curve is not very high on the DVX-100 at all. You just have different scenefiles which are similar to the Custom Presets on a Sony where you set Sharpness, Chroma, FPS things like that.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 04:28 PM

I'm sure that the Sony look is carried into the PD170, which is the replacement to the PD150, which was the replacement to the PD100. So if you don't need progressive-scan, then perhaps you should get the PD170.

If you hope to use the camera for other projects that need more of a film-look, then get the DVX100 and learn to adjust it to look more the PD100 just for this project. If you only need this camera for documentaries where the 60i video look is fine, then get the PD170.
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