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Three Colour Exposure-A Topic Revisited


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 12:45 AM

All,
Sometime ago, I read a thread about a fellow who wanted to, using colour film, expose it successively through red, blue and green filters, to achieve an affect whereby stationary objects would be full colour, but moving objects (such as a stream of water) would be appear as bursts of pure colour. Well, I was fascinated by it, and, wanting to try it myself, I went looking for it, since I remember there being a few tricks to getting it right (namely which filters to use). However, I cannot find the original thread! So, would
anyone be able to describe the process to me (or link me to the original thread)?
Thanks!
Best,
BR
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#2 Matt Butler

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 02:12 AM

Look under< 16mm Only 21 January Richard PT>
Try googling HARRIS SHUTTER as well.

cheers

Edited by matt butler, 13 February 2006 - 02:14 AM.

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#3 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 03:22 AM

Look under< 16mm Only 21 January Richard PT>
Try googling HARRIS SHUTTER as well.

cheers

You can achieve the same effect, and some times a better effect, by printing. Unfortunately it is much more expensive as you have to pay lab costs.

You put three sync marks on your film on adjacent frames and ask the lab to print the film three times using red, green and blue exposures; using the first sync mark for red, second for green and the last for blue. If the grading for your film was 23 24 27 (on a Model C printer) then they would print it 23 00 00 for red, 00 24 00 for green and 27 for blue. I used this effect many years ago for a film that we were printing of ballet dancers. By moving the sync marks further apart you can change the effect ,particularly if the object are moving fast.

You are welcome to contact me off-list if you need further information.
Brian
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 11:47 AM

You can achieve the same effect, and some times a better effect, by printing. Unfortunately it is much more expensive as you have to pay lab costs.

You put three sync marks on your film on adjacent frames and ask the lab to print the film three times using red, green and blue exposures; using the first sync mark for red, second for green and the last for blue. If the grading for your film was 23 24 27 (on a Model C printer) then they would print it 23 00 00 for red, 00 24 00 for green and 27 for blue. I used this effect many years ago for a film that we were printing of ballet dancers. By moving the sync marks further apart you can change the effect ,particularly if the object are moving fast.

You are welcome to contact me off-list if you need further information.
Brian


Yes, that will produce the color "rainbow" effect on moving objects. I think most labs would block the unused light channels with an opaque "filter", rather than simply use TAPE 1 (AFAIK there is no TAPE 00 setting).

I recall that "West Side Story" used the effect at the high school dance sequence.
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#5 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 06:01 PM

Yes, that will produce the color "rainbow" effect on moving objects. I think most labs would block the unused light channels with an opaque "filter", rather than simply use TAPE 1 (AFAIK there is no TAPE 00 setting).

I recall that "West Side Story" used the effect at the high school dance sequence.

Actually there is a 00 setting on Model C's. It is sometimes known as a zero close. I know because I have used it on many occasions.
Brian
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#6 Dominic Case

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 06:10 PM

I think most labs would block the unused light channels with an opaque "filter", rather than simply use TAPE 1 (AFAIK there is no TAPE 00 setting).

It depends on the tape reader and the printer. Some of the older readers on Model C printers will accept a 00 setting - but you also have to be able to punch that value in the tape, and not all systems permit it.

A setting of 01 doesn't necessarily come close: normally the actual light vane opening on the printer is the tape setting plus the printer trim (offset) setting, but a 00 tape instructs the light vane to close completely regardless of the trim setting. So it can be very different from - say - a tape 01 + trim 12 setting.

Opaque "filters" (forgive the oxymoron) do the job perfectly: but if you are printing a job that only requires the 00 setting for one scene, you have to be more ingenious. We can usually find a way B)
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#7 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 04:15 AM

It depends on the tape reader and the printer. Some of the older readers on Model C printers will accept a 00 setting - but you also have to be able to punch that value in the tape, and not all systems permit it.

A setting of 01 doesn't necessarily come close: normally the actual light vane opening on the printer is the tape setting plus the printer trim (offset) setting, but a 00 tape instructs the light vane to close completely regardless of the trim setting. So it can be very different from - say - a tape 01 + trim 12 setting.

Opaque "filters" (forgive the oxymoron) do the job perfectly: but if you are printing a job that only requires the 00 setting for one scene, you have to be more ingenious. We can usually find a way B)


You can get around the case of a tape system that does not permit 00 by using light 1, covering the hole with tape and duplicating the tape. Very time consuming if you have lots of lights to change!
Brian
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies