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How to determine if 7218 has been exposed?


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#1 Matt Sander

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 07:26 PM

I am lighting a 22 minute drama right now called Fool's Blues, and I am in a bit of predicament. My 2nd AC approached me late into our first day of shooting and told me that he 'thinks' he may have accidentally exposed a 400ft roll of 7218. He isn't positive whether or not, but he may have left the mag open while he did a scratch test.

We are working on a fairly limited budget, that roll is about 7% of our negative stock. Is there some way to determine whether or not the film has been exposed? Will a lab charge for that kind of service?

Thanks for your help,

Matt
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 07:36 PM

I am lighting a 22 minute drama right now called Fool's Blues, and I am in a bit of predicament. My 2nd AC approached me late into our first day of shooting and told me that he 'thinks' he may have accidentally exposed a 400ft roll of 7218. He isn't positive whether or not, but he may have left the mag open while he did a scratch test.

We are working on a fairly limited budget, that roll is about 7% of our negative stock. Is there some way to determine whether or not the film has been exposed? Will a lab charge for that kind of service?

Thanks for your help,

Matt


Depends on the lab, but I have had a questionable roll once and clipped off about a foot(in a changing tent), sealed it and brought it to a lab and they processed it and it had not been ruined. Would be cheaper than buying another roll.

-Tim
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#3 timHealy

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:17 PM

If for whatever reason you cannot process a small strip of film for a test, consider asking yourself would it be cheaper to buy a replacement roll now or try and get all of your actors, crew, equipment, and locations back togther for a reshoot later if the film does turn out to be bad after spending money on processing? Unfortunately accidents and mishaps happen on every film shoot. Learning how to deal with them appropriately is part of the process. Good luck.

Best

Tim

Edited by heel_e, 13 February 2006 - 08:19 PM.

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