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daVinci vs daVinci


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#1 Aleksandar Bracinac

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 02:32 AM

Can anyone explan to me what is the technical difference between 2Kplus & Renaissance 8:8:8 except the resolution?

Thank you.

Aleksandar Bracinac
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#2 Michael Most

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 12:51 PM

Can anyone explan to me what is the technical difference between 2Kplus & Renaissance 8:8:8 except the resolution?


The 8:8:8 Renaissance (usually set up with DUI these days) is a standard definition box only. That means no HD, no data. That's the primary difference. The 2K's also have far more advanced vector isolations (with soft falloffs, not available on the 8:8:8) as well as extended gamma range in the 2K Plus and a key bus. The 2K, being an HD capable device, also allows mixed frame rate editing (via the TLC), i.e., 24 frame HD and 30 frame/60 field standard def simultaneosly. Additionally, the 2K line has many options that don't exist on the previous devices, and many of them have become quite popular. Power tiers (i.e., additional "levels" of correction, 2 per tier, allowing multiple power windows), defocus (very powerful and useful if you know how to apply it), the Colorist's Toolbox (a collection of special effects), and the ability to work with data are some of them. The bottom line is that the 2K and the 2K Plus are far more advanced and allow an experienced colorist to do a lot more creatively. If you're working in HD, there is no choice, but even if you aren't, the 2K is a superior system. The panels may look similar, but that's where the similarity ends.
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#3 J. Lamar King

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 12:59 PM

The 8:8:8 Renaisance can feel a bit limiting if you're trying to get some of the extreme looks in commercials these days.
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#4 Marc Wielage

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 07:14 AM

I agree with both of the above comments about the daVinci 2K vs. the 8:8:8.

I would add that the 8:8:8 is ancient technology at this point, and as far as I know, the software on that system hasn't been updated much over the past 7 or 7 years. The 2K has a lot of advantages in terms of processing power, multiple power windows, and other effects, and I would also give it the edge in terms of producing "cleaner" pictures.

I also particularly like the 2K's built-in still-store system, which makes it much faster and easier to match complex shots.

We routinely use the 2K on even standard-def jobs, so don't think of the daVinci 2K as being intended mainly for 2K projects. I think of it more as an HD color-corrector that internally processes material at 2K.

--Marc W.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 10:33 AM

Hi,

What I most like about using an HD corrector on an SD project is that all the selectivity and area-cropping is stil done internally at HD resolution - making vector rolloffs a lot smoother and less noisy. This goes for all kinds of other equipment to - working at HD then spitting it out as SD gives superb results.

Phil
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