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Yikes! Power outage and film stock soaked in fridge!


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#1 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 06:24 AM

Hello. Power went out when I was not at home. Had several sealed boxes of unexposed 30m spools of 16mm and super8 end up soaked. My fault that they were not in ziploc freezer bags.
Anyway wondering if the filmstock could perhaps be alright.
Any similar experiences?
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#2 Andy Sparaco SOC

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 08:28 AM

Hello. Power went out when I was not at home. Had several sealed boxes of unexposed 30m spools of 16mm and super8 end up soaked. My fault that they were not in ziploc freezer bags.
Anyway wondering if the filmstock could perhaps be alright.
Any similar experiences?


Processing and xfer cost more then the stock-discard them. Not good even for scratch test as the emulsion may slough off.

Gosh, I love the light in Paris
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#3 Freya Black

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 01:28 PM

Hello. Power went out when I was not at home. Had several sealed boxes of unexposed 30m spools of 16mm and super8 end up soaked. My fault that they were not in ziploc freezer bags.
Anyway wondering if the filmstock could perhaps be alright.
Any similar experiences?


Don't discard them, donate them to me. I'll do something with them! :)

But hey failing that I think you should give a visual examination of your packaging. I don't know what 100foot spools of film come in these days. If it is just a cardboard wrapper you may be a bit stuffed as your film has likely got a damn good soaking and is only useful for weird Freya projects. If it comes in those little plastic boxes or even those old metal tins, then you might be okay. This is one big advantage of 400foot loads as they come in metal tins.

The super 8 might be in with a much better chance I think because the packets are made of a foil material that might be water resistant and then the cart itself might also protect the film.

I'm not trying to be mean Dan, but I must say this if only for the other people who might be reading this. Those little sealable plastic freezer bags are really cheap and you can grab them from your supermarket. You can even re-use them as it's not like you are putting food in there. Be sure to get some before you even think of storing your film in the fridge or freezer etc.

If you are storing stuff like 100 foot spools that might have poor packaging, or even S8 carts, then it may well be worth investing in a biscuit tin, or some other metal or plastic packaging that will protect your film further. You can tape up the edges too. If you do this, I suggest that you still put each film in a sealable plastic bag within your film box cache thing. Also don't store your film on the bottom shelf.

I expect you have thought of all this at this point anyway Dan but just for other people reading...
Film is too expensive to waste.

...and on that subject, don't ever bin film, theres it may be useless for any kind of proffesional production but there are lots of little people doing weird things who will probably appreciate it.

love

Freya
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#4 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 01:31 PM

Even the super8 in the sealed foil?
This is a drag! I suggest to everyone to be careful of this.
Just a few ziplocs would have made all the difference.
Yep! Paris has incredible light!
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#5 Freya Black

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 08:46 AM

Even the super8 in the sealed foil?
This is a drag! I suggest to everyone to be careful of this.
Just a few ziplocs would have made all the difference.
Yep! Paris has incredible light!


No the S8 may be okay, it just depends on if the water has got into the film.

Water is bad for film, especially over time as it can cause the emulsion to float off the base.

The S8 may be protected by the cart and the foil, if water didn't get it then you will be fine.

We can't say if it will be okay or not because you havn't given much detail about the situation. Look at the inside of the foil container, if there are water drops in there then it might be bad. If it is all dry then it probably won't have got in the cart either. This is one situation where the S8 cart might save you, but it does depend on if water got inside the cart.

The 100foot spools are likely to have less protection. You don't say what the stocks are. If any of the 100foots are black and white and you have a home processing tank, then you could shoot the film right away and process it right away. In this case you might even want to keep the film wet. This is not a good idea in a camera with an electric motor or even probably in a bolex but I expect it would be fine in a filmo or an old keystone or something similar. Or you could try drying out the black and white stock and shooting it, but the film might stick to itself and you may have bits of film with no emulsion or raggedy looking film. Not good if you are shooting something unrepeatable.

You could also try drying the film in complete darkness by removing it from the spool and hanging it up. Being wet it may be prone to collect dust and you would need to be certain it was totally dark. The emulsion may still be damaged if it sat it water for days.

But perhaps the film is okay? You aren't giving us any indication of how bad it is. You could run your fingers along the film in a dark room and see if you feel any water.

As I say the S8 is in with the best chance. However even if it seems okay, you might want to shoot it preety soon rather than leaving it hanging around because even if water didn't get into the films then the seal might be breached leading to a rise in humidity. Don't stick them back in the fridge. Keep them somewhere dry.

love

Freya
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 02:09 PM

Hello. Power went out when I was not at home. Had several sealed boxes of unexposed 30m spools of 16mm and super8 end up soaked. My fault that they were not in ziploc freezer bags.
Anyway wondering if the filmstock could perhaps be alright.
Any similar experiences?


The Kodak factory sealed packaging (foil bags or taped cans) should resist water penetration, but may not completely prevent it. Thoroughly dry the outside of the packaging, then open it in a darkroom. If the film feels dry, and is not sticking at all, you probably are fine. If there is any free water or condensation inside the package, best to discard the film.

Caution: Sometimes when a refrigerator compressor fails, it actually can HEAT the inside of the refrigerator, making it like an oven. If the film got really hot for a while, it may have been adversely affected. With a simple power failure, hopefully the film never got much above room temperature.
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#7 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:13 PM

So, may be should we say "if it looks fine and does'nt stink, make a sensitometric curve" ?
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