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sundance digital projection format question


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#1 Grainy

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 07:31 PM

Hi, couldn't find specifics on this on the site but I was checking out the sundance web site for last year's digital projection formats and they say
"As a reference point only, we have projected digital in the past in HD CAM format, Non-Anamorphic, and 1080i/16:9 60i"
How does this translate in terms of what kind of media you can submit for digital projection? Or does it?
I guess I'd assume a digibeta tape would fall into the standard somewhere for digital projection, but does it?
thanks much!
G
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 09:34 PM

I think it's pretty clear: Sundance projects digitally using 60i/1080 HDCAM tapes.

So whatever you've mastered your movie on or at, Mini-DV or Digital Betacam, 24P, 25P, 50i, whatever, you need to spend the money to get it converted to 60i/1080 HDCAM.

Even if you shoot 24P/1080 HDCAM, you need to get a 60i/1080 HDCAM tape made from your master. They only want one tape format to deal with in the projection booths.

Everything gets projected 16x9 as well (1.78), so if you shot for 2.35 projection, most likely it will be shown as letterboxed unless they let you fiddle with the image before the screening. It is possible to fill a 16x9 HD recording with a 2.35 image with a slight squeeze to it, but Sundance does not have the special projector lens necessary to unsqueeze it to 2.35. So if you have a 4x3 image or a 2.35 image, it has to be on a 16x9 HD recording with whatever side mattes or letterboxing needed to preserve the aspect ratio you want.
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#3 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 11:26 PM

I think it's pretty clear: Sundance projects digitally using 60i/1080 HDCAM tapes.

So whatever you've mastered your movie on or at, Mini-DV or Digital Betacam, 24P, 25P, 50i, whatever, you need to spend the money to get it converted to 60i/1080 HDCAM.

Even if you shoot 24P/1080 HDCAM, you need to get a 60i/1080 HDCAM tape made from your master. They only want one tape format to deal with in the projection booths.

Everything gets projected 16x9 as well (1.78), so if you shot for 2.35 projection, most likely it will be shown as letterboxed unless they let you fiddle with the image before the screening. It is possible to fill a 16x9 HD recording with a 2.35 image with a slight squeeze to it, but Sundance does not have the special projector lens necessary to unsqueeze it to 2.35. So if you have a 4x3 image or a 2.35 image, it has to be on a 16x9 HD recording with whatever side mattes or letterboxing needed to preserve the aspect ratio you want.


Well explained. Everyone seemed to have problems understanding the anamorphic part. Most festivals that project HD have the same standards as above. SXSW is the same. And for the record, Sundance is loathe to let anyone even speak to the projectionist as they don't want uptight filmmakers bugging them.
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#4 Grainy

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 01:30 PM

That clarifies it for me, thanks David and Eric!
G.
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