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$14 steadicam anyone?


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#1 Jake Johnson

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 12:36 AM

Has anybody tried this? If so, how well does it work. Is it worth it?
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#2 david west

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 02:46 AM

Has anybody tried this? If so, how well does it work. Is it worth it?



http://www.homebuiltstabilizers.com/

try here before you build that one....
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#3 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:04 AM

they work but they wreck your shoulder and lower back if you use a heavy camera for any period of time

thanks

Rolfe
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#4 Chien Huey

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:50 AM

Ditto. I know a guy who has shoulder problems from using his Glidecam 2000 (which is essentially a commercially built $14 steadicam) with his PD150.

The last time I worked with him, we ended up using a wheelchair to get the tracking shot because 1) with just your arm supporting it unless you've got huge biceps the rig dips because you're getting weaker and 2) there are times your arm/shoulder is just shaking from the weight and getting weak that it negates the stabilization.

All in all, gives me that much more respect for steadicam operators - running along with S16 or 35 cams on their rigs.
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:11 PM

Just remember, you pay for what you get. For $14 I wouldn't expect anything better than handheld.
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#6 Seth Mondragon

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:35 AM

I wouldn't expect much from a $14 rig....I have the Glidecam 2000Pro and to be honest some of the shots aren't all that great (but many are), mainly because like mentioned in an above post, your arm gets tired pretty quick. True, I'm using a Sony VX2100 with approx. 4lbs of counterweight.....I think Glidecam now has a body harness to use with the 2000 Pro and 4000 Pro...
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#7 drcode

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 05:27 PM

I've used the original for my blog both upright and flipped, but then I'm using a barely prosumer DV videocamera. Nothing like a 16 or 35mm rig. My latest version which I started with this last weekend is longer, with a ball joint above the camera mount for flipped work close to the ground. I use it to shoot womens shoes and boots from ground level.

The video I shot this weekend is here:

http://www.thebootcam.com (Not recommended for work, but nothing explicit). Blog Post from 2/26/06.

Here is a pic of the rig:

Posted Image

Definitely with a heavier camera it would be more difficult, I'm wondering how it will do with the HVX200 camera I'll be getting soon.

Michael
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Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC