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Arri SR 16mm or Arri BL 16mm


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#1 Vedran Rupich

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 01:52 PM

I´m going to shoot a music video on 16mm.
It´s my first time using 16mm, have used 8mm and i need to start with 16mm.
But the thing is that i dont know much about it. For example, the two cameras mentioned that i have at
my disposal, is it difficult to load them?
and how is it done?
which of the two cameras would you prefer and why?

what filmstock should i use if im shooting indoor tungsten?
i need the most versatile filmstock that wouldnt complicate stuff for me.
do i need a light meter in order to set the fstops or does the camera one on it?

all advice are welcome!!! (except for "shoot with video" it is out of the question)
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 02:24 PM

I´m going to shoot a music video on 16mm.
It´s my first time using 16mm, have used 8mm and i need to start with 16mm.
But the thing is that i dont know much about it. For example, the two cameras mentioned that i have at
my disposal, is it difficult to load them?
and how is it done?
which of the two cameras would you prefer and why?

what filmstock should i use if im shooting indoor tungsten?
i need the most versatile filmstock that wouldnt complicate stuff for me.
do i need a light meter in order to set the fstops or does the camera one on it?

all advice are welcome!!! (except for "shoot with video" it is out of the question)


I would certainly go with the Arri SR over the BL. Not too tough to load and just a much better and much more versatile camera, no need for blimps, etc. If you can, get a copy of Jon Fauer's Arriflex 16SR book, probably find one on eBay or a used bookstore (it's out of print).

If you are lighting with tungsten, then go with Kodak Vision 2 500T (not the Expression, just the normal 500T). Super fast, small grain, very versatile.

The Arriflex 16SR did come with an internal light meter, though I don't know anyone who has actually used it. Get a handheld light meter, doesn't need to be a spot meter, and you should be good.

Good Luck,
-Tim
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#3 Rik Andino

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 06:16 PM

Both Cameras you mention are really good...
But the Arri 16SR is better--it's much more modern and easier to use.

If you can't shoot with the Arri 16SR for whatever reason...
Don't be afraid to use the Arri 16BL it's a good camera...although it requires a little practice
It isn't as easy or straightfoward as the Arri 16SR...and the lens options are limited.

I recommend testing out whichever camera before use and "playing" with it sometime before shooting.
If you're going to DP a shoot, it helps to be confident enough in your skill with the equipment.
Also make sure your Assistant Camera person knows the camera well enough...
Or else you might wind up loading the damn thing yourself--I've worked on a few student shoots before. :)

Kodak 7218 (V2 500T) is a great stock and versatile for many kinds of condition.
If your ultimate product is only going to end up on TV the it won't be too grainy to be a bother
Especially if you do some post work on it to soften the graininess and raw look.

But if you're looking for a much finer stock use Kodak 7217 (that's 200T)
It's an excellent stock and can be quite versatile, it just needs a bit more light.

Also Fuji 500 Eterna is also a beautiful stock that rivals Kodak 7218 (although John Pytlak won't agree :) )

if you're shooting in mixed lighting conditions try Fuji 500D Reala
It's good if you're doing alot available light shooting and under fluorescents.

Also Fuji has the only 250T stock availalbe if that's what you're after.

So there are your options, make your choice.


Lastly use a lightmeter and don't rely on the camera it's easier and safer that way.
You can probably find a Sekonic L398 for under $100 bucks on ebay--just search.

Music Videos are really fun for cinematographers because they can take much more creative risk...
So don't be afraid to play with creativity and come up with really wild and funky visuals.
So have fun---just remember to get your scenes & shots and make your day.
Us producers get mad if that don't happen. :)



Good Luck
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