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POV: of baby coming to life


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#1 Ermetekos

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 08:47 AM

Hey all,

i am in the process of making a movie.
I have a shot where a baby is born in a delivery room and there is a shot where I have to show the POV (point of view) of the baby coming out to the world.

Would u have any clues or ideas on how to achieve such effect?


re:spex
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 10:40 AM

I thought babies didn't open their eyes until sometime after being born.
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#3 Greg Gross

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 11:15 AM

Obviously there is some anatomy not to be seen on screen. I'm assuming film for the
cinema and not educational but drama.

Shot #1, Camera A- We see physician,nurse standing very close in to patient. This is a
medium shot. We are looking at the backs of the delivery room med-
cal staff. We hear a baby crying.

Shot #2, Camera B- We see the head of the infant protuding out of the mother tightly framed
and surrounded by sterile o.r. drapes. Infant's head is cradled on both sides
by the physician's hands(gloved). This is a Close-Up and shot with good taste
in mind. Assuming appropriate camera angle.

Shot #3, Camera A- Close-Up, We see approx. 1/2 of infant protruding from the mother and again
tightly framed with sterile drapes. We see the gloved hands of the physician
supporting the infant on both sides. Assuming appropriate camera angle. We
see infant moving and the infant crying.

Shot #4, Camera B- Infant is now totally out of the mother's body(we do not see the mother). Phy-
iscian hands the infant to the nurse. Medium Close-UP.

Shot #5, Camera A- Master Shot of labor and delivery room. We hear the infant crying,its being held
in the arms of the nurse. Fade Out

I wonder if there is "stock" footage available(licensed) that could be used for this scene? Then edited in
post production. I am not a cinematographer or a director. I am a student cinematographer but a long
time professional photographer. Of course I know there is consideration to be had here for your budget.
I do my own independent productions,so I have to produce,direct,light. I look at filmmaking as a constant
flow of solving problems,meeting expectations. This is how I would approach it. I would have to shoot it
with two DVX-100A's or two PD-170's. I'm a medical professional also and I do have access to anatomical
dummies which I could use. Of course this would call for some real modifications with framing,camera ang-
les and would limit the action, but I believe it could be done. Good luck with your shoot! Of course in still
photgraphy we have access to a multitude of stock photos.

Greg Gross
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#4 Alexandre Lucena

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 11:15 AM

How about an out of focus, smudged and over exposed image of a hospital ceiling with fluorescents
and the sweaty face of a doctor. my 2 cents.

Alexandre.

P.S we shall not attempt to pull out a small camera from someones vagina though :(
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#5 Greg Gross

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 11:29 AM

Now there is another approach! You hear the infant crying,everythings in focus just
enough to get the point across. The viewer has to imagine a little bit about what is
happening. Out of focus action,dialogue,sound effects. Do you think we are forcing
the viewer to think too much??

Greg Gross
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#6 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 07:51 PM

Over-exposed, out of focus, and kind of subtly manic as the baby would be handled for wiping, umbilical cord cutting, etc. This is all not realistic because I believe as well that babies don't open their eyes until some time after birth.
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#7 Dan Goulder

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 08:18 PM

Hey all,

i am in the process of making a movie.
I have a shot where a baby is born in a delivery room and there is a shot where I have to show the POV (point of view) of the baby coming out to the world.

Would u have any clues or ideas on how to achieve such effect?
re:spex

Check out "The Tin Drum" or "Look Who's Talking" for ideas. Don't forget, for absolute authenticity, you've got to show the gown-clad father holding a camcorder and looking queasy.
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#8 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 08:50 PM

If this is a dramatic representation you should take as much creative license as you need, that's the beauty of filmmaking. If you inserted a "critter cam" I doubt the shot would work.

A few things that I know: They used to shave the mother. At most hospitals (in the US anyway) they don't any more. Babys do open their eyes very soon but not while they are coming out. A baby's vision is blured but even if it weren't at this time their brains have not developed the ability to make any sence out of what they are seeing.

Perhaps you should have a large birthing canal made by an artist. Put a low profile camera into a tube with a spherical port and just push it through. Perhaps you may need the mother's legs also. The sides of the birthing canal should be made thin so you can get a little light glow as you approach the opening. When you finish your film we are all curious to see it.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 10:13 PM

Here's a situation where a lot of vaseline over the lens would actually be motivated.
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#10 Greg Gross

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 11:54 PM

Yes, and cost effective also. One could stay within the budget.

Greg Gross
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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:22 AM

Here's a situation where a lot of vaseline over the lens would actually be motivated.


As I was reading this tread I was goiing to suggest the exact same thing. Sence babies can't focus their eyes when they're new born A large amount of vaselline over a clear class plate in front of the lens would work. It should go from completely black to bright, bright light in an instant. everything should be a blur , the light loses some of it's intensity until shadows and colored blobs in the light are discernable, but no real discernable shapes however.
The light should be bright to the point of being uncomfortable but not brilliantly overwhelming as it was in the first few seconds. Shadows and blob like shapes should move within the light giving the scene an almost frightening or etherial quality.

As the camera pans and tilts in a random, uncontrolled sort of way (the baby's head moving or being moved), the light should flash and fade, move out of view. the view should darken then become bright again randomly during the segment. the shadows (people and objects around the baby) also move on their own except for stationary objects (chairs tables, bed ect. which appear to the baby as non moving blobs with less color) Nothing should feel static. The blobs should be colored brillantly, neon, dayglo. vivid. ( even though this is not real world it will convey the feeling of seeing things for the first time.)

Make sure to cut back to the baby after the lightshow so the audience will understand whats going on. A close up of the eyes may be too on the nose but that may be what's nesseary to convey who's POV it is. A wide shot of the baby in the mother's arms may seffice. I would definately establish the segment with a shot of the baby before cutting to it's POV. Maybe that's where you want a loose CU of the baby's face somwhat profile to show it's looking at something. The people around the baby should have muted tones of the same colors that appeared so brillantly in the baby's POV.

Done forget sound, The baby's mother's voice should be distiquishable but the words should not, only the emotional quality of what she's saying. The rest of the sound should sound loud, strange, unrecognisible, maybe with bangs or blares that are startelling, but somehow famillar to the audience. ( common or appropriate sounds for the location ran though a synthisizer perhaps) I hope this will help you. It's my viision of what I would do with the segment based on your description.
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#12 Ermetekos

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 04:24 AM

Thank you all for your time you took to reply to my question.

Actually this is going to be my last shot for the movie and I am not going to have a real baby to shoot. So after the POV its fade to black and end titles.

I am going to try putting vaseline onto the lens, that should be sth to definitely try. I was also thinking about overexposed unrecognisable blurry images.
i am going to try and handle the camera as if it came out of the mothers legs. Was thinking of loud subsonic sounds. Am thinking of trying use of After Effects, and see if any filters make sth catchy (Final Effects: effect-distort-CC Split) as some people have suggested.

Am hoping for the best, since that is the last image that the audience will see.

Regards

Mario
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#13 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 09:54 PM

Sounds like you put some thought into it. When it's done post it on the Critque my work or whatever. I'd love to see what you did with it.
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#14 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:17 PM

I am going to try putting vaseline onto the lens, that should be sth to definitely try. I was also thinking about overexposed unrecognisable blurry images.
i am going to try and handle the camera as if it came out of the mothers legs. Was thinking of loud subsonic sounds. Am thinking of trying use of After Effects, and see if any filters make sth catchy (Final Effects: effect-distort-CC Split) as some people have suggested.


i saw your similar thread on mograph. i think the CC split thing was meant as a phallic joke (if you try using that effect, i think you'll see why). though i guess you could tweak it to make it work.

also, --in case this isn't totally obvious for you-- if you use the vaseline technique, use an inexpensive or used uv/skylight/clear filter. you don't wanna have to clean vaseline off of a good filter, or especially your lens.

hope this helps,
jaan
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#15 Ermetekos

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 06:28 AM

i saw your similar thread on mograph. i think the CC split thing was meant as a phallic joke (if you try using that effect, i think you'll see why). though i guess you could tweak it to make it work.

jaan


hi jaan, i thought so too at firt. I tried using it, well yes with the default settings the outcome is pretty lame.
u do get some interesting results if u fiddle around.

As Capt.Video requested, i will post my result onto the critique my work, for further creative conversation.

That will happen around 20 March. I finish shooting on the 14th, (if all goes well!!), and then its back 2 the drawing board...
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#16 Bob Hayes

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 01:31 AM

The first job I had in the industry was pulling focus on a 35mm IIC while filming a live birth for an MOW. The baby came out the doctor held it up to my camera. The baby looked right in the lens and let out a joyous cry. The mother started crying saying "It's a boy, a wonderful boy!" then I started crying. It was a great way to start in this industry.
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#17 Matt Pacini

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 06:05 PM

Here's a situation where a lot of vaseline over the lens would actually be motivated.



Yeah, or maybe even some afterbirth on the lens. Maybe Tiffen makes an "Afterbirth 2" filter?
You could always use some of that colonoscopy footage that's out there. I dare say most people not in the medical profession are going to know what the difference is, if it's fast, and you could blur it when you edit. This might be good for the "coming through the birth canal" shot.

I don't know what the posters intention for this shot is, but be ready for histerical laughter.
I think this is one of those shots that you can't do without it being comical.

Seriously, just fade in with the POV of the baby looking at the doctors or whatever, with a really wide lens, blurry, etc.

MP
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#18 steve hyde

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 06:19 PM

Pedro Almodovar has worked in these kinds of spaces with imaginative and tasteful results. I'm reminded of "Hable con Ella".. Maybe you will get some ideas by reviewing the film.

Steve
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#19 Emre Safak

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 07:52 PM

Pedro Almodovar has worked in these kinds of spaces with imaginative and tasteful results. I'm reminded of "Hable con Ella".. Maybe you will get some ideas by reviewing the film.

Don't make people watch that! It was the most vile piece of footage I have ever seen. I am still trying to forget it.
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#20 steve hyde

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 08:44 PM

Well.... depicting a rape is always going to be vile. Rape is vile. Let's not forget that...

This is cinema

Steve
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