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#1 Alex Corn

Alex Corn
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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:34 PM

Hi,
I recently came across an old Richter R2 Collimator. It's old and hasn't been used in a long time. I'm just wondering if a collimator can be off, and if so how to calibrate it. I just don't want to start using it unless I know it is accurate. Thanks.
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 04:28 PM

Hi,
I recently came across an old Richter R2 Collimator. It's old and hasn't been used in a long time. I'm just wondering if a collimator can be off, and if so how to calibrate it. I just don't want to start using it unless I know it is accurate. Thanks.


Hi,

I QUOTE 'The Collimator is an optical instrument consisting of a well corrected objective lens with an illumated reticle at its focal plane. The emerging beam is parallel (collimated beam) so that the image of the reticle is projecred at infinity. The collimator is usually set up in this way known as infinity adjustment'

my source http://www.trioptics.com then products then optitest then PDF

There is a great deal of info their!

Stephen
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