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3 year old film stock still good?


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#1 Eugene Lehnert

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:01 AM

I shot with a 3 year old roll of Kodak film this weekend. It's been sitting in my refrigerator since I won it from Kodak a few years ago. The film was color with a film speed of 320 ASA, the stock was 7277. Any advice on processing this film? Should we push it a stop or maybe we should have overexposed the film a bit?

Thanks!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:18 AM

I shot with a 3 year old roll of Kodak film this weekend. It's been sitting in my refrigerator since I won it from Kodak a few years ago. The film was color with a film speed of 320 ASA, the stock was 7277. Any advice on processing this film? Should we push it a stop or maybe we should have overexposed the film a bit?

Thanks!


Hi,

I would rate it between 160-200 ASA. If its for a telecine finish it should be fine. If you need to print then send a short piece to your lab for evaluation. They will almost certanly tell you its no good!

Good luck,

Stephen
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#3 Eugene Lehnert

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:34 AM

We will be doing a video transfer only most likely. I doubt we will ever make a print, but it maybe possible.

Why is the transfer better than making a print? If I rated the film at 320 ASA when I shot with it will pushing it help us at all? Pushing it a stop maybe?
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 12:53 PM

We will be doing a video transfer only most likely. I doubt we will ever make a print, but it maybe possible.

Why is the transfer better than making a print? If I rated the film at 320 ASA when I shot with it will pushing it help us at all? Pushing it a stop maybe?


Hi,

Telecine is more flexable. It may not be possible to get a good print from old stock. I would not advise Push 1 stop with old film, the fog level is high enough already!

Stephen
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 01:30 PM

I shot with a 3 year old roll of Kodak film this weekend. It's been sitting in my refrigerator since I won it from Kodak a few years ago. The film was color with a film speed of 320 ASA, the stock was 7277. Any advice on processing this film? Should we push it a stop or maybe we should have overexposed the film a bit?

Thanks!


If the film has been refrigerated the entire time, it likely has very slight fog increase from ambient radiation. If you gave it normal exposure (usually a bit of overexposure is a good idea with old color negative film), I would still process NORMALLY. With old film that may have increased fog level, a push process is usually not helpful, and will tend to accentuate any increase in grain and fog level from old age.
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#6 Eugene Lehnert

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:02 PM

Excellent. Thanks guys.
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