Jump to content


results of a 500t push test


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Andrew Evans

Andrew Evans
  • Guests

Posted 22 February 2006 - 03:47 PM

I recently shot a test where I shot three separate rolls of Kodak vision2 500t in a low light situation. I had one roll processed normal, one pushed 1 stop, and the other pushed 2 stops. My question regards the results. I assumed that the roll pushed 2 stops would have the most grain and it does. However, it has less color saturation than the roll pushed 1 stop. I really like the color I got from the 1 stop push and I also like the grain from the 2 stop push. Shouldn't the roll pushed 2 stops have more color saturation than the other rolls? It was all processed and transfered at the same place, but I have a feeling it has something to do with the transfer. I should at least be able to get the same color out of the 2 stop roll right?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:02 PM

Pushing is non-standard processing so there's no law saying that you keep gaining saturation with each stop pushed. In fact, you also gain an increase in base fog level with each stop pushed which would tend to soften colors. Funky non-linear things start to happen the more you push.

But if this is for video transfer, why not just increase saturation with digital color-correction? If this is for print, then printing and projecting the test is the only way to know for sure what the results will be.
  • 0

#3 Andrew Evans

Andrew Evans
  • Guests

Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:26 PM

Pushing is non-standard processing so there's no law saying that you keep gaining saturation with each stop pushed. In fact, you also gain an increase in base fog level with each stop pushed which would tend to soften colors. Funky non-linear things start to happen the more you push.

But if this is for video transfer, why not just increase saturation with digital color-correction? If this is for print, then printing and projecting the test is the only way to know for sure what the results will be.


thanks, I didn't know about the base fog level increase. That definitly explains some things. I have a feeling I was confusing saturation with contrast (contrast does increase as you push right?). Also, this is for video transfer and as much as I would like to print and project I can't afford it. Anyway, it sounds like I should experiment with color correction on the 2 stop push if I wanted to keep the grain.
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 22 February 2006 - 05:07 PM

Contrast goes up as you push but so does the base fog level, milking your blacks, which can give the impression of less contrast even though in terms of exposure range, you have more contrast. So you start to get a milky, high-contrast image with heavy pushing if that makes sense (and it also starts to shift color, like towards the green.)
  • 0

#5 Andrew Evans

Andrew Evans
  • Guests

Posted 22 February 2006 - 05:37 PM

Contrast goes up as you push but so does the base fog level, milking your blacks, which can give the impression of less contrast even though in terms of exposure range, you have more contrast. So you start to get a milky, high-contrast image with heavy pushing if that makes sense (and it also starts to shift color, like towards the green.)


Yeah, it looks almost pre flashed (but still has contrast) and the shift towards green is really evident in the skin tones. I'm going to experiment with some color correction on all the rolls and will keep you informed as I proceed. Thanks.
  • 0


CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Glidecam

The Slider

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Visual Products

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets