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Hand Processing E6


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#1 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 11:03 AM

Just recieved an E6 chemicals processing Kit.

It says it can process 6 x 135/36 films.

So how can I work out how many rolls of Super 8 Ektachrome 64T I can safely process with this quantity.

Cheers,
Andy
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 04:14 PM

Just recieved an E6 chemicals processing Kit.

It says it can process 6 x 135/36 films.

So how can I work out how many rolls of Super 8 Ektachrome 64T I can safely process with this quantity.

Cheers,
Andy


Calculate and compare the surface area of each film:

35mm: Approximately 36 exp x 36mm long x 35mm wide = 45,360 square millimeters

Super-8: Approximately 50 ft x 12 inches x 25.4 mm/in x 8mm wide = 121,920 square millimeters

45360/121920 x 6 = 2.2 rolls of Super-8

Lots of assumptions, such as ignoring the area of the perforations, and what the densities of the unexposed areas and the picture areas are.

Probably safe to say 2 or 3 rolls would be okay.
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#3 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 04:37 PM

Super-8: Approximately 50 ft x 12 inches x 25.4 mm/in x 8mm wide = 121,920 square millimeters


Cheers John, much appreciated especially as I was educated with metric figures so the idea of transfering feet and inches to metric seems daunting.
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#4 Gareth North

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 06:24 PM

Hi Andy.

May i ask you what machinery you are using to perform the E6 processing on your Super 8mm 64T film?

As i'm trying to find a way to home process Super 16mm E6. Check my thread "Can E6 Reversal stock 100D (7285) Be processed in a Photo Therm Super Sidekick?" For fuller details.

Would love to know how you are processing it!

Best Regards

Gareth
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#5 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 08:54 AM

Hi Gareth

I'm afraid i'm not using anything particularly high tech just a 50' Lomo tank for super 8/16mm film like the ones found here; http://www.geocities...netank/tank.htm . The tank is simple and got a reputation for reliability. The only reason i'm doing it myself is there are no E6 labs in the UK that do super 8, you can use a third party agent to send it to a main-land europe lab which makes it more expensive and has a slower turn around.

That guy on the website used to sell the Lomos, but people on this board have noted that he has sold out of the 50' and 100' versions. I guess the 25' (for regular 8mm) version would still be usefull for processing camera tests like steady or back-focus for 16mm cameras, where the quantity is very low. The tank i was going to use is not owned by me but No. Where. Lab in london which has several to use in-house.

From reading the info on those processors you've found, you're setting yourself quite an engineering challenge which will take quite a bit of skill on your part to overcome. The problem will be the sheer volume of film you have to load into the device safely, so you may find it cheaper as well as safer to use a proffesional lab. also for proffesional work will an insurance company provide cover for accidents in processing? For a proffsional unit have you tried; www.kitmondo.com.

Also http://www.geocities...netank/tank.htm again seems to sell a small processing machine, if he had one perhaps you could adapt it with an emersion heater to provide the correct temperatures for E6 - probably best to get an electrican to check it over before pluging it in though.

Best of luck,
Andy
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#6 Matthew Day

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 02:39 PM

"The only reason i'm doing it myself is there are no E6 labs in the UK that do super 8..."

the widescreen centre (www.widescreen-centre.co.uk) do process-paid ektachrome for £18.50 at the moment.
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#7 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:25 PM

"The only reason i'm doing it myself is there are no E6 labs in the UK that do super 8..."

the widescreen centre (www.widescreen-centre.co.uk) do process-paid ektachrome for £18.50 at the moment.


Alas said previously,

"...you can use a third party agent to send it to a main-land europe lab which makes it more expensive and has a slower turn around..."

The widescreen centre does provide developing for process-paid Ektachrome which is not too bad for money... but if you already got the stock then they are expensive, considering the slow turnaround.
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