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5293, the quest for enlightement


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 09:00 PM

Does anyone know anything about 5293 stock. I looked on the Kodak website and didn't come up with much with tends to make me think it's been discontinued. I bought a short end and wondered if it was tungstin balenced and what filters are needed if any. I was going to use it for a shot sequence in my film w/out sound to test my camera so I wanted to know it's visual quaiities, properties and what it's commonly used for. The film can has the lable torn off so it's of no use for info. Any help would be greatly appreiciated. Thanks.
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#2 Travis Cline

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 09:19 PM

5293 was discontinued last year. It is a sweet stock, I luckily got 50.000' of it last summer for a feature I did after it had been discontinued. It is a tungsten balanced 200ASA film. I prefer to rate it at 160ASA while not wearing an 85 filter and at 100ASA when wearing an 85 filter. Gives it a little more snap. A little extra contrast. Have fun, it is a very sexy stock. Don't shoot a boring old test to see if the camera works though, shoot something fun to look at, you'll like the results.

Travis
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 10:36 PM

Does anyone know anything about 5293 stock. I looked on the Kodak website and didn't come up with much with tends to make me think it's been discontinued. I bought a short end and wondered if it was tungstin balenced and what filters are needed if any. I was going to use it for a shot sequence in my film w/out sound to test my camera so I wanted to know it's visual quaiities, properties and what it's commonly used for. The film can has the lable torn off so it's of no use for info. Any help would be greatly appreiciated. Thanks.


Yes, EASTMAN EXR 200T Color Negative Film 5293/7293 was on the market from 1992 until 2004.

Here is the technical data:

http://www.kodak.com...tive/5293.jhtml

How old is the short end you have?
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 11:08 PM

The shot i was planning to use this on is a shot of an astornaut in a dark colored spacesuit onboard a small open quad-like space craft as he flys to retrieveing a piece of space debris from a missing probe. This would use a greenscreen and have columns of nebula gas, actuator jet blasts, the debris (except for the piece he touches) and a starfield inserted digitally into the sceneand smoke (either digital or smoke machine) in the very near foreground. The lighting would be dark and moody. the main colors are lt. grey, white, black with bits of red orange yellow and blue w/ alarge frosted globe filled w/ flashing lights to simulate the craft's drive. Does this film stock lend it's self to that sort of mood, color plalette and effects or would it be best used for something else? I'm not sure how old it is I think the guy said less than a year. Thanks for the link.

WOW! After reading the discription, makes me wonder why they discontinued it.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 11:18 PM

WOW! After reading the discription, makes me wonder why they discontinued it.


It was replaced by Vision 5274 200T, which in turn was replaced by Vision-2 5217 200T. Each generation got a little finer-grained than the previous one. 5293 was a 14-year-old emulsion design after all. Just that some people liked its punchier EXR look. A lot of the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy was shot on it, as was all of "The Terminal" and a lot of "Master and Commander" even though 5274 was available to them.
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#6 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 01:37 AM

That's the reason. I saw on another thread that you had said 5217 was the standard choice for cromakeying, Does this film, the 5293, have good keying traits? I would imagine so if they used it on Lord Of the Rings.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 10:49 AM

In 35mm, it probably keys fine, although back then, a lot of people were using SFX200 for chroma key shots, a stock obsoleted once 5217 came out.

In 16mm, 7293 is probably too soft & grainy for good keying.

A lot of the ability to make a key depends on how the chroma key was lit and exposed, and how good your chroma key / compositing software is. Some cheaper software may have trouble handling smoke difting across the chroma key background.

Also depends on the quality of the digital format the film is scanned to. You could telecine 35mm to Mini-DV and get crappy keys from that.
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#8 Stephen Williams

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 01:17 PM

In 35mm, it probably keys fine, although back then, a lot of people were using SFX200 for chroma key shots, a stock obsoleted once 5217 came out.


Hi,

In the old optical printer days people prefered 5248 over 5293 for blue screen work.

Stephen
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#9 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 09:18 PM

I've got a good lighting guy. He's a pro w/ 18 years or more of expirence and that has his own lighting and grip company, but I'm gonna have to figure out what to do about telecine. Most everything I have is geared to mini DV. If you have suggestions I would love to hear them. Thanks

Edited by Capt.Video, 25 February 2006 - 09:19 PM.

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