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shooting at the end of a roll


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#1 dbledwn11

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 02:14 PM

another question.

once you get to the end of a roll of film and carry on shooting whats the wost thing that could happen?

light still can't get any further than the gate since thats how its designed and the roll just keeps going round and round i would of thought.

does that sound right?

shooting on an arri sr2 in case you needed to know the mag design.

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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 02:46 PM

another question.

once you get to the end of a roll of film and carry on shooting whats the wost thing that could happen?

light still can't get any further than the gate since thats how its designed and the roll just keeps going round and round i would of thought.

does that sound right?

shooting on an arri sr2 in case you needed to know the mag design.


Hi,

The exposed film in the mag is fine, the takes without film are clearly lost!

Stephen
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#3 dbledwn11

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 02:55 PM

Hi,

The exposed film in the mag is fine, the takes without film are clearly lost!

Stephen



oh what! NOOO!

... nah just kidding.

yeh it was kinda depressing. was directing a short film. shooting for three hours in freezing weather and discovered we had been shooting at the end of a roll just as the sun had set!

oh well. major lesson learnt there.

thanks.
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 09:08 PM

yeh it was kinda depressing. was directing a short film. shooting for three hours in freezing weather and discovered we had been shooting at the end of a roll just as the sun had set!

oh well. major lesson learnt there.

thanks.

I hav ebeen told that it is a good idea to flag to the lab that the film did run out in the shot, just so that they "might" take extra case to not cut off any of the end of the roll. I really doubt if it helps.

Using short ends in a filmo, most of my rolls end with the film flapping. Amazing how fast you go through 60 feet of film at 24FPS. :rolleyes:
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#5 Joshua Reis

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 04:19 AM

Also, at the head and tail of a roll you will typicaly see more dust on the film. Especialy with short ends. Yes, be sure to mark in the camera report "save tails or "critical tails" to give the lab notice as to not cut too much off the end of the roll. When prepping for telecine, a short amount is also lost when the camera rolls are assembled. This may also increase the amount of dust and film handling at the ends (scratches) depending on the quality of the lab.
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#6 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 11:29 AM

Also, after rolling out, be sure to clean the mag and the camera more thoroughly, as often times a small chip will break off that can cause scratches.
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Technodolly

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Paralinx LLC

Opal

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS