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High speed film (7251)


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#1 Jan Weis

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 12:06 PM

I've aquired some Ektachrome 7251 high speed reversal film and I'm thinking about using this film for a ten minute short. I know high speed films are usually used for sport events and low light situations so I assume the best condition for shooting this film is not in the middle of the day but more likely during dawn and dusk for the best possible results.

Am I on the right track here? And what kind of ''look'' can I expect this film to provide?

Basically I'm asking if its worth bothering with at all.


Thanks.

//Jan
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 12:38 PM

I've aquired some Ektachrome 7251 high speed reversal film and I'm thinking about using this film for a ten minute short. I know high speed films are usually used for sport events and low light situations so I assume the best condition for shooting this film is not in the middle of the day but more likely during dawn and dusk for the best possible results.

Am I on the right track here? And what kind of ''look'' can I expect this film to provide?

Basically I'm asking if its worth bothering with at all.
Thanks.

//Jan


The film is a projection-contrast high speed reversal film that used relatively old emulsion technology. It is also likely well over a year old, since it was discontinued in late 2004.

As you note, a high speed film would normally be used for lower light situations, or higher frame rates (e.g., sports photography, instrumentation photography). To get that speed, larger-grained emulsions are used. You certainly can use the film for daylight shooting (reducing light level with ND filtration), but expect to have a noticeably grainier image than a slower, more modern reversal film like 7285.

Today, unless you want the "look" of a projection contrast reversal film, color negative film is a better choice for telecine or digital intermediate. Color negative films have much more latitude and flexibility, and the lower contrast of the sensitometry is much easier for the telecine/scanner to accomodate.

If you use the film, edit it, and project it directly, you will likely be pleased with the result. But for telecine/scanning, you will find a color negative film will give you a "look" more in line with today's productions.

As mentioned in answering your other thread, even if refrigerated, you may find a bit more grain and lower density blacks due to film age, mostly from ambient radiation. But for the right project, if the "retro" look of a high speed reversal film is what you want, you will likely be pleased.
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#3 Jan Weis

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 01:23 PM

The film is a projection-contrast high speed reversal film that used relatively old emulsion technology. It is also likely well over a year old, since it was discontinued in late 2004.

As you note, a high speed film would normally be used for lower light situations, or higher frame rates (e.g., sports photography, instrumentation photography). To get that speed, larger-grained emulsions are used. You certainly can use the film for daylight shooting (reducing light level with ND filtration), but expect to have a noticeably grainier image than a slower, more modern reversal film like 7285.

Today, unless you want the "look" of a projection contrast reversal film, color negative film is a better choice for telecine or digital intermediate. Color negative films have much more latitude and flexibility, and the lower contrast of the sensitometry is much easier for the telecine/scanner to accomodate.

If you use the film, edit it, and project it directly, you will likely be pleased with the result. But for telecine/scanning, you will find a color negative film will give you a "look" more in line with today's productions.

As mentioned in answering your other thread, even if refrigerated, you may find a bit more grain and lower density blacks due to film age, mostly from ambient radiation. But for the right project, if the "retro" look of a high speed reversal film is what you want, you will likely be pleased.


You have convinced me to change stock since I am going to edit my movie digitally. I''ll probably go with the 7285 as you sugested, it sounds like the right for my film. I do like modern look in the vision stocks but I persume that 7285 will be better in my case

Once again thanks for your reply John.

//Jan
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 01:26 PM

You have convinced me to change stock since I am going to edit my movie digitally. I''ll probably go with the 7285 as you sugested, it sounds like the right for my film. I do like modern look in the vision stocks but I persume that 7285 will be better in my case

Once again thanks for your reply John.

//Jan


Again, 7285 transferred to video will have higher contrast and a different color palette (more saturation) than color negative film. If that's the "look" you want, it's a good choice. But if you want the "modern" look of the VISION2 stocks, color negative is the better choice.
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#5 Jan Weis

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 01:36 PM

Again, 7285 transferred to video will have higher contrast and a different color palette (more saturation) than color negative film. If that's the "look" you want, it's a good choice. But if you want the "modern" look of the VISION2 stocks, color negative is the better choice.



You read me like an open book. The high contrast look is exactly what I'm looking for but never the less I think I'll test out some Vision 2 as well.
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 02:51 PM

You read me like an open book. The high contrast look is exactly what I'm looking for but never the less I think I'll test out some Vision 2 as well.




Ozzball,


Please PM me if you are interested in selling the 7251 you have.



Chris
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#7 Jan Weis

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 03:50 PM

Ozzball,
Please PM me if you are interested in selling the 7251 you have.
Chris


Hi Chris,

I have sent a reply to your PM


//Jan
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