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what do to with the old stuff!


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#1 Clampet15

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 12:44 PM

Hello, So i'm finally in the post production of my first feature. I recently had half my film transferred out to digital. I had a few rolls that were really old kodak 500T stuff that came out looking.... lets just say artzie... and some, not there. So after I punched myself in my head for buying cheap short ends off of ebay, I came to the realization that I have one more 400ft roll of old kodak 500T left to develope with my other load of stock. Now, the environment that I filmed this roll in was different (more light), but never-the-less, a very old stock. So my question is, Should I push the stock a stop or two durring the developement, or just let them do it digitally in post when transferring it. I know the grain is going to be increased either way, but I would like to know what might be a better way to go about it. Thanks

-Brandon Schwindt
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 01:24 PM

Hello, So i'm finally in the post production of my first feature. I recently had half my film transferred out to digital. I had a few rolls that were really old kodak 500T stuff that came out looking.... lets just say artzie... and some, not there. So after I punched myself in my head for buying cheap short ends off of ebay, I came to the realization that I have one more 400ft roll of old kodak 500T left to develope with my other load of stock. Now, the environment that I filmed this roll in was different (more light), but never-the-less, a very old stock. So my question is, Should I push the stock a stop or two durring the developement, or just let them do it digitally in post when transferring it. I know the grain is going to be increased either way, but I would like to know what might be a better way to go about it. Thanks

-Brandon Schwindt


With older color negative film that may have increased fog levels, a stop or so of overexposure will help get the scene information up the curve and off of the fogged higher speed grains. I would avoid push processing, as it will just increase the fog level and graininess, and increase contrast.
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#3 Clampet15

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 05:19 PM

With older color negative film that may have increased fog levels, a stop or so of overexposure will help get the scene information up the curve and off of the fogged higher speed grains. I would avoid push processing, as it will just increase the fog level and graininess, and increase contrast.


So what I have shot is what I have shot. Just don't mess with the push process and see what comes out? Unfortunatly the age was unknown to me at the time of shooting, so I rated it at 500. I guess this falls into one of those unfortunate lessons I needed to learn about shooting films. Thanks.

-Brandon
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