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vision 200T slightly overexposed?


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#1 daniel mahlknecht

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 02:14 PM

Hi,
I need an advice, I'm shooting this days a short fiction in super16 mm on vision 200T filmstock. We are shooting in a small boat on the sea in the bright sunlight. as I have no ND filters (just a 85), and my lens (nikon fotolenses on a aaton ltr7 with fixed shutter at 180° 25f/sec) closes only to 22, but my lightmeter reads 22.9 (incident light metering with half ball of the meter in the sun the other in the shaddow), i had to overexpose all the shots. Exept for the very pale face of our actress I'm not so worried abouth exposure, but I have no experience with this filmstock. My question is, should I tell the lab to compensate this overexposure already when processing the negative, or is overexposing nearly one stop ok and can be handled in the positive print?
unfortunalely we could do no tests before, because we are ultralowbudget and have just 5 rolls of film.

thanks
daniel
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 02:36 PM

Hi,
I need an advice, I'm shooting this days a short fiction in super16 mm on vision 200T filmstock. We are shooting in a small boat on the sea in the bright sunlight. as I have no ND filters (just a 85), and my lens (nikon fotolenses on a aaton ltr7 with fixed shutter at 180° 25f/sec) closes only to 22, but my lightmeter reads 22.9 (incident light metering with half ball of the meter in the sun the other in the shaddow), i had to overexpose all the shots. Exept for the very pale face of our actress I'm not so worried abouth exposure, but I have no experience with this filmstock. My question is, should I tell the lab to compensate this overexposure already when processing the negative, or is overexposing nearly one stop ok and can be handled in the positive print?
unfortunalely we could do no tests before, because we are ultralowbudget and have just 5 rolls of film.

thanks
daniel


Hi,

I think it will be fine, your overexposure is nearer 1/2 stop which is fairly standard practice in any case.

Stephen
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#3 daniel mahlknecht

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 02:45 PM

thanks for the the fast reply. I will sleep better tonight.

daniel
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 05:35 PM

I'm sure you'll be fine, but you should ALWAYS carry ND filters when shooting outdoors. In direct high sunlight on a clear day, you're slightly over an f/16 on 50 ASA film, so that tells you that you're almost always going to need ND filters in sunlight.

You can also use a Pola as an ND in a pinch, since it cuts about a stop and a half of light usually.

The problem is not so much shooting one-stop overexposed, but using a lens at f/22, which is not its optimal setting -- diffraction around small irises will reduce sharpness. Unless it is a super telephoto lens.
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#5 Sam Wells

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 09:18 PM

The problem is not so much shooting one-stop overexposed, but using a lens at f/22, which is not its optimal setting -- diffraction around small irises will reduce sharpness. Unless it is a super telephoto lens.


If your Nikon is on the long side it might not be too bad, but I really think the kind of unsharpness caused by diffration is sometimes more unpleasant than the unsharpness caused by aberrations at a wide stops; maybe this is just personal taste but....

You don't say if it was 8274 or 7217 but I've really slammed 7274 and brought it down to a nice place in printing...

-Sam
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#6 daniel mahlknecht

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 04:26 PM

its a 7274.
i know i will need filters, but i just spent all my money on this camera and not being payed for this work i couldn't aford to buy filters, also because I already have some for my crossziel 4x4 mattebox, but in the short time i had i couldn't build an adapter for the aaton. the lenses i use unfortunately are not very great exept for the 24mm 1,8. i'm also using a sigma 8mm lens with aatonmount, but must have ben a fotolens, flangefocus is totaly wrong,but it is possible to focus with the eye, still in front of this lens i can not put filters,and inside the lens i already have the 85.
I'm now geting also some 50asa D filmstock as the director/producer managed to get it for free.
I hope it can be mixed with the vision.
Anyhow on the next film the cameraequippement willbe fully adapted to the situation (I hope at least)

thanks
daniel
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#7 andres victorero

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 08:46 AM

Hi,
I need an advice, I'm shooting this days a short fiction in super16 mm on vision 200T filmstock. We are shooting in a small boat on the sea in the bright sunlight. as I have no ND filters (just a 85), and my lens (nikon fotolenses on a aaton ltr7 with fixed shutter at 180° 25f/sec) closes only to 22, but my lightmeter reads 22.9 (incident light metering with half ball of the meter in the sun the other in the shaddow), i had to overexpose all the shots. Exept for the very pale face of our actress I'm not so worried abouth exposure, but I have no experience with this filmstock. My question is, should I tell the lab to compensate this overexposure already when processing the negative, or is overexposing nearly one stop ok and can be handled in the positive print?
unfortunalely we could do no tests before, because we are ultralowbudget and have just 5 rolls of film.

thanks
daniel


shooting in this condition would be a waste of time and money. Film is expensive :(

I suggest to buy a ND .9 your stop would be f 11 - f 8 . ( a more reasonable f stop)

the ND are cheap filters and can be bought in a lot of places. If your lens have a rare crew you can attach with galfer tape.

good luck
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#8 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 09:25 AM

I always try get a

.3
.6
.9
soft edge grad and a
pola

for outdoors as a minimum

thanks

Rolfe
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