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5218 rated at 400iso


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#1 Arni Heimir

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 05:19 PM

In a recent cameraguild article. They discuss overexposing the negative.

Rousselot chose to work with a modest film palette. He mainly used the Kodak Vision2 500T 5218 negative... He slightly over-exposed the 5218 stock by rating it for an exposure index of 400 to get a somewhat richer negative, but cautions that this is not a recipe for all situations.

My question is: In what situation is best not to rate it at 400 and secondly: Didn't Allan Davieu rate the entire picture at 400 instead of 500?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 05:27 PM

In a recent cameraguild article. They discuss overexposing the negative.

Rousselot chose to work with a modest film palette. He mainly used the Kodak Vision2 500T 5218 negative... He slightly over-exposed the 5218 stock by rating it for an exposure index of 400 to get a somewhat richer negative, but cautions that this is not a recipe for all situations.

My question is: In what situation is best not to rate it at 400 and secondly: Didn't Allan Davieu rate the entire picture at 400 instead of 500?


Generally you can leave the rating at 400 ASA for a 500 ASA stock if that gives you the best look and is fast enough for you. There is a certain black level / contrast / saturation look from using those sets of printer lights, so perhaps Rousselot is talking about some unique situation where you'd want something different in look because of the subject matter. Or he might be saying that doing that (rating 500 ASA stock at 400) is not enough grain reduction for all applications and you should switch to a slower-speed stock.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 09:34 AM

In a recent cameraguild article. They discuss overexposing the negative.

Rousselot chose to work with a modest film palette. He mainly used the Kodak Vision2 500T 5218 negative... He slightly over-exposed the 5218 stock by rating it for an exposure index of 400 to get a somewhat richer negative, but cautions that this is not a recipe for all situations.

My question is: In what situation is best not to rate it at 400 and secondly: Didn't Allan Davieu rate the entire picture at 400 instead of 500?


The Exposure Index assigned by the film manufacturer is a starting point. In most cases, using a film at its rated EI will give very good results. But a cinematographer may decide to increase exposure to get even more shadow detail, richer blacks, or reduced graininess. Slight underexposure can be used to hide shadow detail, or reduce contrast in the darker areas of the scene. Some information on the Kodak website:

http://www.kodak.com...t/faq/#preprod8

Why is the speed rating of motion picture camera films given in Exposure Indices rather than ASA or DIN values?
There is no ANSI standard to determine the speed of these films.
The speed of motion picture camera films and the suggested filtrations are determined on the basis of practical picture tests. Suitable safety factors have been included to allow for differences in cameras, variation in lighting, etc. The exposure index values should not be regarded as numbers which express the absolute speed or sensitivity of the film, neither should they be regarded as fixed values which can not be changed if the results of repeated tests indicate the need for such changes


http://www.kodak.com...b/tib5209.shtml

Exposure Indexes (EI) Used to Measure Motion Picture Film Speed
Unlike still photography film, there are no published standards to determine the speed of motion picture film. Motion picture film speed and the suggested filtrations are determined by practical picture tests. Suitable safety factors are included to allow for camera differences, lighting variation, etc. Exposure Index (EI) values do not express the absolute film speed or sensitivity, and should not be regarded as fixed values. Because EI values are not fixed, they can be changed if repeated testing indicates the need for a change.


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