Jump to content


Photo

learning film


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Craig Agee

Craig Agee
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 48 posts
  • Other
  • indianapolis

Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:35 PM

im curious what someone would reccomend with a budget of $1,000 to learn about film.possibly 16mm,super 8,although i only want to buy something that will atleast hold its value(dv is out of the question)particulary a fully manual camera.i know $1,000 is a modest budget for a film camera but its still not a small chunk of change either and im not aspiring to become a DP or anything,just learning i already have a job.my best friend is an audio engineer,i am a photographer and we want to mess around for fun and make some short films.i know synch costs $$$...ive done research and have found the following interesting: the least apealing a k3,bolex h16 reflex,CP16(if i can find an affordable one)canon 1014 super 8,and just MAYBE,although i would be going over my budget ive seen arri 16s packages for about $1,500 although i dont know the shape they would be in.i dunno this is a lousy post sorry but would like to anyones reccomendations.

ps
hasselblad and zeiss glass might be up for possible trade
also pentax 645 stuff and some nikon slr outfits if anyone is interested

im sorry i probably shouldve posted this in the 'first time filmmakers' thread...apologize for the mistake
  • 0

#2 Joe Gioielli

Joe Gioielli
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 March 2006 - 11:48 AM

Ok, as no one else has responded, I'll share a few ideas, take it or leave it ':D'

You talk about "holding it's value" and dv being out. I'm not sure that film cameras are going to hold their value, especally 16mm. 16 was used by students, education, doc makers. Like it or not, digital is taking those markets. I would not assueme for a moment that an NPR your buy today will sell for the same money tomorrow. As a still photographer, I'm sure you have seen the prices of used film cameras drop like a rock.

The words "low budget" and "digital" really were made for each other. If you are truly just making films for your own pleasure (nothing wrong with that) I think dv makes alot of sense. Everything about film is expensive. Have you considered how you are going to edit? Are you going to need sound? How are you going to watch it? Are you going to use the NLE to DVD to TV chain? Then why not save the telecine step and just shoot dv? You also get to record live sound with alot less hassle.

Yes, image quality is an important factor. But so is being able to get the project done.

Now, if, after consideration, you still want to shoot movie film, good. I would not spend that much money on the first camera. If you wanted to learn to play guitar, you wouldn't run out and buy a fender. Start with a resonable learning tool. You seem to be more interested in 16mm, so I would point you toward a K3. Yes, I know you don't want one, but I feel it fits the bill perfectly. Spend your money on film.

Best of luck with the new project.

Joe
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Opal

Visual Products

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Opal

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Willys Widgets