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contrast in War of the worlds


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#1 Filip Plesha

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 12:18 PM

The film has quite a contrast, both on DVD and in cinema (as I remember)

Since as far as I know, they didn't do a DI on that film, how did they treat the image like that?
Is it pushed or skip bleach, or something else?
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#2 Keith Mottram

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 12:44 PM

The film has quite a contrast, both on DVD and in cinema (as I remember)

Since as far as I know, they didn't do a DI on that film, how did they treat the image like that?
Is it pushed or skip bleach, or something else?


It did go through a bleach bypass.

Keith
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#3 Filip Plesha

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 01:13 PM

On the prints or "preprint" material?

I remember, while It did look contrasty, it didn't have the blacks (like Alien ressurection for example), looked more like when you look at a high contrast film on TV (contrasty, but not that much density)
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 01:35 PM

The theatrical prints used a silver retention process (not full skip-bleach, but some level of ENR or ACE, depending on whether Technicolor or Deluxe made the prints.)

The home video transfer used a low-con print, rumor has it, rather than an IP, because there is more grain and contrast in the low-con print (I don't think he bothered though to do any silver retention process to it though).

I think Kaminski feels that a transfer from an IP looks too clean and clinical, so the low-con print gets him closer to the harshness, grittiness, and softness of the theatrical ENR prints. I believe the final transfers for "A.I.", "Minority Report", and "War of the Worlds" were all done this way; I don't know about "The Terminal" since that movie went through a D.I. and doesn't have that gritty look.

It's a bit confusing because the term "low-con print" implies that it must be lower in contrast than an IP/IN, but it isn't. An IP or IN is closer to the contrast of the OCN, whereas a low-con print is a notch less contrasty than a theatrical print. Low-con prints tend to be less sharp than an IP since they are made on a continuous contact printer (like prints), not a pin-registered printer.
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#5 Filip Plesha

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 02:20 PM

Now that you mention it, the DVD really did look a lot like a film print. Not just in contrast, but the general tonality of the print (the way highlights behave as oposed to regular transfers), very interesting.
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#6 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 02:35 PM

It's a bit confusing because the term "low-con print" implies that it must be lower in contrast than an IP/IN, but it isn't. An IP or IN is closer to the contrast of the OCN, whereas a low-con print is a notch less contrasty than a theatrical print. Low-con prints tend to be less sharp than an IP since they are made on a continuous contact printer (like prints), not a pin-registered printer.


---A projected low-con print has startlingly weak blacks.

The lab I was at made all of their I/Ps on a continuous contact printer, then I/Ns from those.

Many of these I/Ps were for MGM and Sony transfers.

Often I'd get I/Ps and I/Ns which had KS positive perfs. Even on I/N replacement sections for damaged OCNs.

---LV
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