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Passing Film Through an X-Ray


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#1 David Sweetman

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 12:29 AM

I know you can't pass motion picture film through an x-ray, but I've got a buddy who's going to Uganda and taking his 35mm SLR with him. Can you pass still film through an x-ray? I would assume tourists do it all the time...what's up with that? Will it screw up his film?

thanks
Dave
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#2 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 12:44 AM

Theres a few threads already on the subject like this one:

http://www.cinematog...=10434&hl=x-ray

Best bet, take your film in a seperate bag for carryon and tell them HAND INSPECTION.
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#3 Dominic Case

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 02:03 AM

One difference with still film is that if you get slight fogging over part of one frame, it might not be very noticeable - but the same fogging on a roll of motion picture film will show up as a flickering density that changes from frame to frame - much more objectionable.

This will happen if your roll of film is in the x-ray shadow of something else - like the next can of film, or the edge of the x-ray beam - so it doesn't get uniformly fogged.

It's also easier to carry a handful of cassettes and get them hand-inspected: the security guys often know what a 35mm cassette looks like, but they are less familiar with a carton of 400 ft rolls of 16mm motion picture stock.
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#4 william koon

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 03:53 AM

One difference with still film is that if you get slight fogging over part of one frame, it might not be very noticeable - but the same fogging on a roll of motion picture film will show up as a flickering density that changes from frame to frame - much more objectionable.

This will happen if your roll of film is in the x-ray shadow of something else - like the next can of film, or the edge of the x-ray beam - so it doesn't get uniformly fogged.

It's also easier to carry a handful of cassettes and get them hand-inspected: the security guys often know what a 35mm cassette looks like, but they are less familiar with a carton of 400 ft rolls of 16mm motion picture stock.

I presume you mention this problem in ports. I thought that almost all ports are using filmsave machine to screen for security posing no threat to our film now. Can we thrust them ?
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Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

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CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc