Jump to content


Photo

who owns a camera?


  • Please log in to reply
59 replies to this topic

#1 Delorme Jean-Marie

Delorme Jean-Marie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • paris, france

Posted 07 March 2006 - 02:00 PM

many of you own their camera.
what cam did you purchase and to do what?
explain us why you thought it was the best choice and with the time was it finally the best choice?

rolling this thread can help those who want to purchase a camera to take advantage of the experience of the others

personally i'm thinking of buying an A-Cam to film music videos
  • 0

#2 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11943 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 March 2006 - 02:14 PM

Hi,

I get the impression you're talking about film cameras. I own a Panasonic AG-DVC200, which is a fairly middle of the road ENG style video camera. Even at the time I bought it, it was obvious that the (much more expensive) DSR-570 would have been a much better choice as it does widescreen, which is now invariably required by UK broadcasters. I should have taken out a bigger loan....

The reason for the purchase was one long-running documentary that I knew would pay for it.

Phil
  • 0

#3 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 March 2006 - 04:06 PM

I currently own an Aaton LTR54 Super-16 camera package and a Sony Z1 HDV video package. Each was purchased and later expanded upon for specific productions that helped directly or indirectly pay for the gear. The Aaton was purchased a decade ago, originally for a long form documentary that covered nearly half its cost. Subsequent purchases for the package (lenses, videotap, followfocus, etc.) were made for specific jobs along the way. That package now has more than US$100K into it. The HDV package was bought last summer specifically for a 5-week shoot that paid for about 2/3rds of it. Within a week after finishing that job I had a corporate shoot that sent the camera well into profit, which makes that a pretty quick turnaround on investment.

I also own some sound gear, a teleprompter, some lighting and a jib arm. All were purchased for specific jobs and have made back their money and then some. I bought the jib before anything else, and only because at the time I had some clients who I knew would rent it from me. Still, I had spent months investigating and deciding which item I would buy and why, and only made the purchase when I had the rental in the bag.
  • 0

#4 Logan Schneider

Logan Schneider
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Bozeman, MT

Posted 07 March 2006 - 04:28 PM

I bought an SR3 a year and a half ago. There were several reasons for this. Firstly, I wanted to gain experience. So far I have been able to shoot or assist on many jobs that I would not have had if I had not owned the camera. Also, because of this my reel is all film. While it would probably be good to have some HD on there, at least there is no DV. Secondly, I wanted to be able to shoot my own projects without having to spend too much money on rentals. Third, super 16mm has more economic staying power than video formats. As a result the camera is worth more today than when I bought it. The last year or two has had a resurgence in Super 16mm, and prices reflect that. Another incentive was the ability to buy filters and accesories that will hold their value for years. Another major consideration was my geographic location. I live in Montana, and my camera is a unique commodity here. Most shoots in the area done on super 16mm use my camera because it is cheaper not to ship equipment in. I've rented it in CA, but most of the work it gets is here in Montana.

I got a good deal on my package. I would probably have and xtr+ or an SR2 if I hadn't found this camera, but even then most of the factors would be the same. I've got $50000 (US) in my package and I think that it was worth every penny.

Logan Schneider
DP
Bozeman, MT
  • 0

#5 Delorme Jean-Marie

Delorme Jean-Marie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • paris, france

Posted 07 March 2006 - 05:26 PM

phil it's absolutly not reserved to film, that why i posted in the cinematographer section and the way you all respond is exactly what i was interested about :

what to buy?
when?
and did the equipment paid for itself at last?

yesterday's purchased were more S16 as i expect today's to be more sd or HD and maybe still S16 or 35
i met a guy in Paris who baught a 15/70 home made in belgium!
  • 0

#6 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 07 March 2006 - 06:29 PM

I have an Arri IIIC with PL Mount, on board video assist, and Tobin speed base.

Also a Konvas 1M to PL Mount conversion, going on the chopping block this week.

I also have a K3, a Bell and Howell Super 8, and a Canon GL1.

All of which I use on a regular basis for a variety of shoots.

I have found that with the high price of renting gear that you might as well at least own a camera body and sticks, then rent the best glass. When you get tired of your gear or want to upgrade you just stick it on ebay and get a good chunk of your money back.

Heck you can buy all the gear you need to shoot a feature in 35mm or 16mm on ebay, put the entire purchase on your credit card, shoot your film and then re-sell the gear on ebay before your credit card statement arrives in the mail.

Basically you get the gear for free, why pay a rental house and never see your money again?

R,
  • 0

#7 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 07 March 2006 - 06:46 PM

I currently own an Aaton LTR54 Super-16 camera package and a Sony Z1 HDV video package. Each was purchased and later expanded upon for specific productions that helped directly or indirectly pay for the gear. The Aaton was purchased a decade ago, originally for a long form documentary that covered nearly half its cost. Subsequent purchases for the package (lenses, videotap, followfocus, etc.) were made for specific jobs along the way. That package now has more than US$100K into it. The HDV package was bought last summer specifically for a 5-week shoot that paid for about 2/3rds of it. Within a week after finishing that job I had a corporate shoot that sent the camera well into profit, which makes that a pretty quick turnaround on investment.

I also own some sound gear, a teleprompter, some lighting and a jib arm. All were purchased for specific jobs and have made back their money and then some. I bought the jib before anything else, and only because at the time I had some clients who I knew would rent it from me. Still, I had spent months investigating and deciding which item I would buy and why, and only made the purchase when I had the rental in the bag.


Mitch,
Try as I have, I can't seem to get into the paint menus on the Z1U. I have no owners manual so any chance you could explain how to open these menus or does it involve joining the Freemasons?

Thanks.
  • 0

#8 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11943 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 March 2006 - 08:16 PM

Hi,

There's two buttons on the back of the thing that both bring up different menus. Sure you're not hitting the wrong one?

Phil
  • 0

#9 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 07 March 2006 - 08:50 PM

Konvas 1m and Jvc GY-500. Film and video production & Cameraman for hire. My 1m is strickly MOS but I'm hoping to get something to do sound sync as soon as possible as I'm starting to really like flm. Later I want to also get an HD ( true HD 4:4:4) camera when the market settles out and I can afford one.
  • 0

#10 Sean Morris

Sean Morris
  • Sustaining Members
  • 83 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney / Australia

Posted 08 March 2006 - 06:33 AM

Hi,

I started off with a trusty DXC-3000P with a clunker SP umatic deck, and then upgraded to a BVP-7 with a
BVV-1!!!!!.... sold that, moved on to two 1657D FIT Thomson Digital 16X9 Heads (french cams) with SP
BVV-5 Backs, also a Sony UVW100P I picked up cheap.

Also an ARRI IIC Hardfronted, Konvas 2M, Kinor Super16, and a mod'ed Kinor 35.

Cheers
Sean
  • 0

#11 matthew david burton

matthew david burton
  • Guests

Posted 08 March 2006 - 09:21 AM

Howdy,
I spent a couple of years using DSR570's and when i left the company to go freelance i went for the XL2 mainly for low cost 16:9 and interchangable lenses.
Initially i was verry disapointed with how the camera operated compared to the DSR. Over time i grew to love it but mainly cuz it was on top of my steadicam and not on my shoulder.
To be honest i should have gone for a bigger ccd cam and nowerdays it's not to hard to find ex an demo/rental.
The XL2 paid for itself in 2 well paid jobs so not a big risk !
A DSR wold have taken quite a few more but would have been more than worth it looking back.
The question is what next !
HVX or an old DSR 500/570 ?
-matt

Edited by matthew david burton, 08 March 2006 - 09:30 AM.

  • 0

#12 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 08 March 2006 - 10:33 AM

I merely own a 40 year old Nikkormat stills camera with 2 lenses (50mm T1.4 and 35mm T2) that look very flattering on faces and flare gorgeously. I use those to shoot stills which help me determine the look that I'm after. But anything more than that is all done on rental gear. And if I need a directors viewfinder I ask my production designer :-)
  • 0

#13 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 08 March 2006 - 10:51 AM

Mitch,
Try as I have, I can't seem to get into the paint menus on the Z1U. I have no owners manual so any chance you could explain how to open these menus or does it involve joining the Freemasons?

Thanks.

You need to hit the Picture Profile button, which is right above the Menu button on the back of the camera. Sony is a little weird in the way they lay out their menus, and that strange architechture extends all the way up to the F900. But once you get used to it you can find all the controls.

I would think that you could download a .pdf version of the manual from the Sony website.
  • 0

#14 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 08 March 2006 - 12:43 PM

You need to hit the Picture Profile button, which is right above the Menu button on the back of the camera. Sony is a little weird in the way they lay out their menus, and that strange architechture extends all the way up to the F900. But once you get used to it you can find all the controls.


Thanks Mitch. That did the trick.

I would think that you could download a .pdf version of the manual from the Sony website.


Yes, You'd think... but you'd (and I'd) be wrong:

http://www.dvinfo.ne...ead.php?t=34322
  • 0

#15 Rupe Whiteman

Rupe Whiteman
  • Sustaining Members
  • 336 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 08 March 2006 - 01:49 PM

buying cameras... I've been toying with buying a broadcast camera recently but there are many factors that made me hesitate, obviously the initial cost is the biggest one but also importantly as technology is changing so fast you might buy a camera and 6 months later it is getting obselete. I'd go and buy the best camera you can if you knew you could pay for it in hire costs otherwise I'd be very careful. I decided to invest more in lighting gear as this can be hired again and again.

- 'Though the great thing about owning your own camera is that you can test it every which way and also know that it is being looked after! If you don't own a camera then you need to develop a relationship with a rental company who'll let you test and try things out - this is great except when they're busy and all the cameras are out!

... I know a guy whose recently invested in digi-beta kit because he has a on-going deal with the BBC - but now the BBC has (unbelievably) decided to shoot most of its mid-range shows on DSR's! - he's now left with a mortgage he'll be lucky to pay back!!

All the best,

Rupe W
  • 0

#16 Victor Viyi

Victor Viyi

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 March 2006 - 04:54 PM

I own an Arri 435ES with a set of Cooke S4 prime lenses. I do music videos, TV Spots and even feature films (Second Unit). It is a very expensive camera package so I also rent it to other DOP's all over the country.

I wanted to get serious in the business so I put all my savings on it, and so far has been a good choice. I don?t recommend other people to follow if they don?t have the right contacts to move the equipment and to get projects, because video 24p and HD are taking over. Still I love the film as a medium and 35mm is the best choice to get the most beautiful images on a screen.

Contact me if you want more info.
  • 0

#17 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 March 2006 - 05:54 PM

I guess your user name says it all then:-)
  • 0

#18 Joe Taylor

Joe Taylor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 March 2006 - 06:51 PM

I have two Arri IIc Bodies with CE Crystal bases and a Norris Intervalometer. I bought them mainly for a project I have been working on, "Dead Lonesome," about ghost towns and the mystique of the western landscape. I also now use them for freelance work. I also have a 35mm Handcranked Debrie that I bought for "Dead Lonesome."
  • 0

#19 Brian Wells

Brian Wells
  • Sustaining Members
  • 438 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 March 2006 - 10:49 PM

I have a DVX100 package with all the bells and whistles. Having this camera has given me the freedom to shoot whenever I feel like it. I have used it for music videos, commercial specs, a documentary, and a pilot. I'd say the investment has been worth it as it has paid for itself over time and given me a lot of enjoyment. Plus, it still has some resale value left, about $500 less than what I paid for it a year ago. Generally though, it is just an expensive toy for shooting personal projects. The company I work for provides SDX900's for us to use, so I may be a bit spoiled. :unsure:
  • 0

#20 Rolfe Klement

Rolfe Klement
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 668 posts
  • Director
  • London | LA

Posted 16 March 2006 - 05:54 AM

I have an Arri 2C with various motors (flat and 3c crystal handgrip)
Various DV Cameras (TRV900 etc)
Stills cameras (Nikon f70, nikkormat, olympus and some old russian thing)

The thing with film cameras is that you can pick up an old MOS 35mm cheap - but all the accessories start to get expensive - but it is cheaper than film school :-)

thanks

Rolfe
  • 0


Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Opal

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Opal

CineTape

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Abel Cine