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about color temperature


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#1 srsaat

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 10:31 AM

hi to everybody,

As we know that sunrise and sunset color temp. is around 2000 degree kelvin .

What would be magic hours color temperature?

IN magic hours even don't have much light and how come one should read the temp. of magic hours??

advance thanx for all valuable answers


thanx,,

fincher
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#2 bolshevik

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 03:55 PM

hi to everybody,

As we know that sunrise and sunset color temp. is around 2000 degree kelvin .

What would be magic hours color temperature?

IN magic hours even don't have much light and how come one should read the temp. of magic hours??

advance thanx for all valuable answers
thanx,,

fincher
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i think my professor told me something around 4200K
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 04:22 PM

hi to everybody,

As we know that sunrise and sunset color temp. is around 2000 degree kelvin .

What would be magic hours color temperature?

IN magic hours even don't have much light and how come one should read the temp. of magic hours??

advance thanx for all valuable answers
thanx,,

fincher
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As the sun sets or rises, the color changes rapidly. You normally are shooting at "magic hour" to capture these color changes on film, so you would usually use film and filters appropriate for daylight, unless you are trying to "stretch the day".

For the record, here are some figures:

http://www.kodak.com...lc=en#selecting

BTW, the color of "magic hour" varies with the cloud cover, smog, haze, and other factors.
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#4 srsaat

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 09:25 PM

As the sun sets or rises, the color changes rapidly. You normally are shooting at "magic hour" to capture these color changes on film, so you would usually use film and filters appropriate for daylight, unless you are trying to "stretch the day".

For the record, here are some figures:

http://www.kodak.com...lc=en#selecting

BTW, the color of "magic hour" varies with the cloud cover, smog, haze, and other factors.



hi john,

thank u for ur answer and then actually that i color variation i know the thing is what is the temp. of that hours.. say darkest dawn or slightly dawn... like this.. if i know this it is helpful for me..

thanx again,,

fincher
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 02:09 AM

The color temperature at dawn and dusk can vary wildly depending on many factors. No one can really tell you what the color temperature is at dusk, especially when they don't know where you are and the conditions in your part of the world. For example, I know that in the mountains the color temp can be 10,000K or higher sometimes, and vary wildly, so any estimate will most likely be pretty far off.
One option would be to get a color temp meter and read it for yourself. And I guarantee that if you read it at sunset it will be different 2 minutes later.
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#6 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 02:37 AM

I tend to shoot magic hour with daylight stock clean (no filters) or Tungsten and an 85
Magic hour is good for either low directional light or no direct light but the entire sky acts as a soft source
The temp will change too rapidly

Why do you need to know the temperature?

thanks

Rolfe
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