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Broadcast Quality High Def specs...


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#1 Steve Larsen

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 08:19 PM

Broadcast Quality High Def specs...

Another s16 to High Def question, I am shooting time-lapse footage with super 16 and would like to know if it will be acceptable ( to USA networks ) as high def / broadcast quality after it is transferred to high def.

I know you can transfer s16 to high def but am unsure of the quality American networks will require in 2007 when they switch over.

I have asked the last three DP's I have worked with this question:

#1 DP - unfamiliar with new technology
#2 DP - Just completed shooting "Godivia's" on S16 and believes that it needs to be "up-ressed" for high def and would not be acceptable to US networks. (Is the up-res needed because the original scan of the film is not high enough quality or because the film res is not high enough ? )
#3 DP - Has s16 and panasonic high def package and thought the s16 was better quality, the director's $0.02 - "high def better than s16 not as good as 35". The DP also thought it might be stock specific and only some film stocks ( > 200 asa ) having fine enough grain to transfer.

thanks in advance,

Steve Larsen.
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 08:45 PM

If you transfer your super 16 footage to HD in 10-bit uncompressed 4:2:2 color, then you'll have a broadcast compatible HD master.

Edited by dgoulder, 08 March 2006 - 08:47 PM.

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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 09:00 PM

Super-16 has been widely used for HD productions. There can be an issue with graininess causing less efficient compression (needing higher bit rates) for satellite, so use good practice to keep the graininess low, especially for the "second tier" cable markets that use high compression to lower satellite charges:

1. Use the slowest film you have the light for.

2. Avoid underexposure. A bit of overexposure helps reduce graininess even more.

3. Avoid push processing.

4. Use the latest generation of films having significantly lower graininess (e.g., Kodak VISION2 stocks).

5. Use any "sharpening" during transfer with moderation, lest you enhance the grain.

http://www.kodak.com...0.1.4.3.8&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...ker/myth2.jhtml

http://www.kodak.com...d=0.1.4.3&lc=en
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#4 santo

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 09:34 PM

Considering how many terrific looking indie films shot on super16 with an HD transfer, and several major US TV series are out there right now, if there are any "issues" it is with the way these dp's shot the projects, or bad telecine work.

I suppose "Godiva's" refers to that CHUM/City TV show. The least of their worries is some kind of "up res" or whatever so it can be on US TV...
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#5 Steve Larsen

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 11:14 PM

Considering how many terrific looking indie films shot on super16 with an HD transfer, and several major US TV series are out there right now, if there are any "issues" it is with the way these dp's shot the projects, or bad telecine work.

I suppose "Godiva's" refers to that CHUM/City TV show. The least of their worries is some kind of "up res" or whatever so it can be on US TV...



I've worked on few super 16 shows / MOW's now and thought s16 was fine to transfer to HD. After talking to a few DP's who's knowledge I respect I became a little confused and wondered if the time and money I was dumping into s16 shooting stock footage was a waste.

As for Godiva's I like the way the DP lights with the time he has. A friend of mine is KGrip and I sometimes do day calls when things are slow in my world.

Thanks for everyones responses, I'm feeling a little better :)
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