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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 03:35 AM

Does anyone use a viewing filter and how does it enhance your lighting technique? Is it something you personally use frequently or don't feel you need it?
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 04:15 AM

I have a few, and do use them some. I find when I am using low light levels, even with the correct viewing filter; things look too dark to be really helpful.

Honestly, the more I use the Vision 2 stocks, the more I realize that I am essentially getting exactly what I see. Of course in the extreme over and under is where the questions come in, but at that point I just use a meter or squint a little ;)

I use the viewing glasses more on day EXT type shots, because sometimes it lets me see how darker greens are going to read compared to the shadows.

I keep one around my neck usually when shooting, but rarely use it.


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#3 william koon

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 09:06 AM

I have a few, and do use them some. I find when I am using low light levels, even with the correct viewing filter; things look too dark to be really helpful.

Honestly, the more I use the Vision 2 stocks, the more I realize that I am essentially getting exactly what I see. Of course in the extreme over and under is where the questions come in, but at that point I just use a meter or squint a little ;)

I use the viewing glasses more on day EXT type shots, because sometimes it lets me see how darker greens are going to read compared to the shadows.

I keep one around my neck usually when shooting, but rarely use it.
Kevin Zanit

It is quite useful for asessing high light. I had borrowed one to try. By the way. Where can I buy one ? How much does it cost?
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 11:07 AM

It is quite useful for asessing high light. I had borrowed one to try. By the way. Where can I buy one ? How much does it cost?


Hi,

I bought mine from www.bhvideo.com I cant remember the exact price but about $40 I think.

Stephen
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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 02:49 PM

I have mine from the days when Kodak and Fuji used to give them to DP's.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 03:11 PM

Tiffen also sells viewing filters:

http://shop.store.ya...fcolviewfi.html

http://www.bhphotovi...e.x=8&image.y=9 B&H Viewing Filters
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 09:39 PM

The reason I bring this up, this was mentioned on an online manual at the Specta site I believe it was, that some old school cinematographer had written. It was a little instruction manual on cinematography that was very interesting and informative for something online and that short though probably a bit elementery for anyone that's been doing this for a while.

Anyway he kept mentioning how he used a viewing filter constantly on set to judge fill light levels umong other things. Now I know a little bit about lighting and though I'm no expert I am famillure with many of the tools of the trade so to speak. However, I hadn't hear of a viewing filter before. I tthought maybe they had been something old school that has sence been replaced by better, more intuitive or easier to use equipment. I then did a seach on ebay and fould one for sale and it went for about 16 bucks. So I though if it's something I should have when shooting film I may want to pick one up.

This cinematographer ( I wish I could remember his name) Said it was an item most cinematographer had slung around their neck right along side the light meter. Is this a fact or again old school thinking? (i've learned when it come to film, never discount the old, sometimes it's as good or better than what "New" )
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#8 Robert Glenn

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 10:45 PM

aewsome I've never known of these.... so which type of filter is considered the general use all purpose filter? Pancromatic? color#2? color#3?

Edited by RobertNC, 14 March 2006 - 10:45 PM.

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#9 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 03:58 AM

There is not one universal filter. The #2 and #3s are for fast and slow films (I don't remember which is which, but any place that sells them can tell you).


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#10 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 03:34 PM

Can someone explain exactly how a viewing filter works? I looked through one the other day and it seemed like I was just looking through an ND filter. Maybe I wasn't looking at the right lighting to tell a difference.

Thanks
Yeomans
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#11 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 05:15 PM

They are ND filters essentially. You just look through it quickly and take it away so your eye doesn't adjust. It just compresses the range of luminance to something more like what film sees. It can help you spot trouble areas that you may not have noticed. I use them mostly on day EXT work.


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#12 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 05:00 PM

They are ND filters essentially. You just look through it quickly and take it away so your eye doesn't adjust. It just compresses the range of luminance to something more like what film sees. It can help you spot trouble areas that you may not have noticed. I use them mostly on day EXT work.
Kevin Zanit


Can someone give me an exact example of how they would or have used a viewing filter? I guess I am just not getting it.

Thanks
Yeomans

Edited by andyyeomans, 05 April 2006 - 05:01 PM.

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