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Is there a problem with my xl1?


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#1 A Bennett

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 06:22 PM

Hi everyone,
Hopefully someone will be able to help. Look at the attached file, one each side of the frame there are black areas. I took this shot as an example (not in focus or anything because its an example), in 16:9 mode, which was then put into Final Cut Pro.
Why am i getting these black areas? It doesnt show on the viewfinder, or on other camera viewfinders.
Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
Many thanks,
Adam.

Also ive just tried the same in 4:3 which is the cameras native, and it does the same.

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#2 Gordon Highland

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 06:23 PM

It's called overscan, and you needn't worry. On a regular television that will get cropped off (to varying degrees depending on the set); you'd only see it if you hit the "underscan" button on a professional monitor. However it is there as part of the actual complete video signal, and why you see it on your desktop. If this clip is destined for viewing on computers you'll want to simply crop it off in your compression application. If it's for television viewing, ignore it. Many consumer/prosumer camera viewfinders do not do a very accurate job of giving you the whole image.
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#3 A Bennett

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 06:28 PM

Thanks for a really rapid reply, was very helpful.
Was a little worried as i just bought the camera.
All my work with the camera is for television, to be viewed in 16:9, so thats okay.
Im not quite sure why final cut pro does that though? It doesnt from other consumer cameras in 16:9 that i own and have used.
Bizzare.
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#4 Gordon Highland

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 09:09 PM

It's not specific to Final Cut Pro. You'll see it in any desktop editing application that displays every pixel of the frame. Some cameras seem to have less of it than others. This isn't based on any technical knowledge, but it seems that digital cameras have less of it than analog cameras. If I shoot Betacam for web, I find myself cropping 6 or 8 pixels off each side, and 4 off the top and bottom, but only like 2 side pixels for a DV cam, with no crop at the top or bottom needed. Your mileage may vary.
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