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Flashing 16mm


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 11:40 AM

I was wanting to try flashing my film (like in McCabe & Mrs. Miller), and I was wondering if it is possible to do this? Well, more specifically, I know they have machines specially made for this, but is it possible to do this on the cheap. I had a thought how, and was wondering if it was reasonable, or just plain silly. Okay, is it not feasable to rig up a camera without the lens, point it toward a light source on a dimmer switch, and select a filter to determine the colour of the light (say, yellow for an aged look). Is this possible? Also, how much light do I need. suppose I'm using 50D, how much light would I want to shine in order to get SOME exposure, but not ruin the film?
Best,
Brian Rose
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 11:57 AM

I was wanting to try flashing my film (like in McCabe & Mrs. Miller), and I was wondering if it is possible to do this? Well, more specifically, I know they have machines specially made for this, but is it possible to do this on the cheap. I had a thought how, and was wondering if it was reasonable, or just plain silly. Okay, is it not feasable to rig up a camera without the lens, point it toward a light source on a dimmer switch, and select a filter to determine the colour of the light (say, yellow for an aged look). Is this possible? Also, how much light do I need. suppose I'm using 50D, how much light would I want to shine in order to get SOME exposure, but not ruin the film?
Best,
Brian Rose


Hi,

I have flashed in camera, using a Mitchell that will run reverse to makes life eazy.

Light a white sheet of paper, make the lens out of focus and shot the roll about 4.5 stops under. Add color as required.

Many years ago when working on an Oxberry down shooter I had so film some black and white photos. The client wanted a 'sepia' look. I double exposed brown wrapping paper about 1 stop under.

Stephen
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#3 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 12:30 PM

Fantastic method, can't wait to try it. Another question: you mentioned you used a Mitchell, since you could back wind the film. I have an Eclair NPR, which does not allow for back winding (though frankly, I'm not upset, because I would hate to scratch teh film running it back and forth). But, is it not possible to simply remove the roll in complete darkness and reload it? Since I haven't exposed any images other than uniform light, it would seem that it would not matter which end of the film went through.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 01:52 PM

Fantastic method, can't wait to try it. Another question: you mentioned you used a Mitchell, since you could back wind the film. I have an Eclair NPR, which does not allow for back winding (though frankly, I'm not upset, because I would hate to scratch teh film running it back and forth). But, is it not possible to simply remove the roll in complete darkness and reload it? Since I haven't exposed any images other than uniform light, it would seem that it would not matter which end of the film went through.


Hi,

With double perf stock you could easily do that! The keycode will be backwards and counting the wrong way but I doubt thats an issue.

With single perf stock you will have wind the film back in the dark. The good thing with a Mitchell, there were so well made you can run the film 100 times through the camera without any scratching.

Stephen
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:08 PM

If you had shot 35mm, you'd have to deal with re-aligning to the original set of four perfs as your initial exposure, otherwise you may be a perf or two out of sync in the second pass. Shouldn't be a problem with 16mm though.

You don't need much exposure to flash an image -- just shoot a grey card out of focus and test different degrees of underexposure for the gray card to get the right amount of flashing. You can gel or filter the gray card to color the flash if you want.

Otherwise, the best method would be to get a 6'x6' mattebox and rent a VariCon. You can also build your own version of a "Lightflex" with a black cardboard box holding a 45 degree angled piece of glass in front of the lens to reflect a softbox above the glass over the image, but it's rather awkward to mount and any wide-angle lenses would need a rather large box.
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:12 PM

If you had shot 35mm, you'd have to deal with re-aligning to the original set of four perfs as your initial exposure, otherwise you may be a perf or two out of sync in the second pass. Shouldn't be a problem with 16mm though.


Hi,

Its quite easy to mark the frame in the gate with a black pen.

Often I test 3 cameras with 1 short end of film using that technique, the first being a Mitchell then rewind the film to reload in an Ultracam Magazine.

Stephen
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Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

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Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

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