Jump to content


Photo

Converting the Konvas 1m to Techniscope


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Stephen Whitehead

Stephen Whitehead
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto, Canada

Posted 11 March 2006 - 08:59 PM

What is the process of converting a 1m to techniscope? I know that you have to change the gate, but what is involved in re-adjusting the motor so only 2-perfs are pulled down instead of 4? also will this decrease the noise slightly and increase the frame stability due to the decreased motion?

Cheers,

Steve
  • 0

#2 Jon-Hebert Barto

Jon-Hebert Barto
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 349 posts
  • Other

Posted 11 March 2006 - 10:11 PM

Unfortunatly, converting a Konvas of any make or model is expensive. About $5,000 US dollars. No , I am not kidding. There are places you can go for this, like Aranda (?) in Australia. I believe they are a member of this site so keep watching this thread to see if they post.

In the meantime I'll tell you what I know...

It does NOT greatly diminish the noise level of the Konvas.
As I said, it is expensive.
You basically have to fabricate new parts and refab existing ones.
The movement is completely rebuilt !!!

The 1m is not the camera I would do this to....maybe a 2M or 7M. They at least have crystal control and are a little bit newer. Remember that the electronics of russian cameras are limited and will one day fail for good!!! Converting a 1M cost too much for this type of camera, IMHO. I like Konvas' and stick up for them plenty, but I just want to give you my .02 . The cost ratio is just too high for this particular camera....

Sell your 1M and save some more dough for a Eclair Cameflex. They are also known as CM3 and something else I forgot... ;) These cameras take the techniscope transition much better and have a good track record with this upgrade. THX-1138 and American graffiti were filmed with this package...and lots of talent!

Again, Konvas' are great, sturdy little buggers but it just doesn't make much sense to me. It's like putting a Yenko Camero engine inside of a Rambler. Like I said, keep an eye on this thread and Bruce may give you better info....
  • 0

#3 Bruce McNaughton

Bruce McNaughton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 114 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Melbourne Australia

Posted 13 March 2006 - 02:37 AM

Hi

Yes he just about covered it. The Konvas is not the best choice for 2 perf conversion, any model. However the later the model, the better is the ratio between cost of camera/cost of conversion. All Konvas models cost just under $USD5,000 to convert compared with an Arri 2C at $3,500. I know which camera I would prefer... Spend the saved $1,500 and buy an Arri...

The design of the Konvas does necessitate a thorough re-build, complete claw, crank, main shaft, counterweight, magazine drive, gate of course. We provide a new 2.35:1/1.78:1 ground glass for all cameras but the Konvas alone has a poor viewfinder design which darkens severely, starting at the edges, as you stop down. I guess this and other design inadequacies (you can't check for scratches easily, you can't observe if the film is running freely, difficult-to-load magazines, very ordinary motor mounting system...) is why they are cheap to buy.

But if you are going into a 2 perf production and you have a Konvas, you can still use it in 4 perf as an emergency backup to 2 perf cameras and extract the 2 perf images from it. This way it gets some use.

Regards

Bruce
  • 0


Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Visual Products

Glidecam

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio