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judging the negative?


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#1 rajavel

rajavel
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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:02 AM

Hi all
I am going to be testing various stocks and various warming filters like 81 ef, corals and like. Kindly guide me how to rate the test after I have shot it and processed it.
When I look at the negative thro the grading machine (color master)?I really don?t know what I am looking at?meaning?the original negative how it looks?because the grading machine has already preset readings of colors. And even when all readings are brought to zero(assuming that will show nature of the negative)?.the negative looks bizarre (like overly blue or like)?..but when minor adjustments on the grader brings a normalcy to the negative?.but how do I judge the nature of that negative look. Is that ?adjusted for normal??really the normal negative for all the exact exposures given for the negative.

If I am confusing u all too much?trying to be simple?..is there a clear cut way to check even the minor exposure differences (1/2 and 1 ) and the tonal differences (warm to blue) accurately WITHOUT THE INFLUENCE OF THE GRADING MACHINE playing a role in deciding the character of the negative. Hope I made it better now.
Thanks to one and all.
rajavel
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#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:14 AM

Depends on if this is for print or just for video transfer. If for print, you need to have a gray scale at the head of the roll shot in "white" light at the ASA rating you prefer and have the whole roll printed at the one set of lights needed to make the gray scale look "correct". Then you can judge the following shots as what they would look like at those printer lights on the print stock you choose.

If this is just for video transfer, starting out correcting for the gray scale at the head of the roll helps as a starting point, but basically if you like however it looks corrected, then that's the way it looks, at least when using that telecine and color-corrector and that monitor.

Negative is meant to be altered into a positive image for viewing -- the look of the negative itself is less relevant than the look of the positive image you can create from it.

But if you want to reduce the variables, then printing and projecting is the best way to judge the film stock, plus you'll be seeing it using the most critical method -- large screen projection where at least you can judge relative graininess and sharpness of the stocks.
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#3 rajavel

rajavel
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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:23 AM

[quote name='David Mullen' date='Mar 13 2006, 10:44 AM' post='95296']
Depends on if this is for print or just for video transfer. If for print, you need to have a gray scale at the head of the roll shot in "white" light at the ASA rating you prefer and have the whole roll printed at the one set of lights needed to make the gray scale look "correct". Then you can judge the following shots as what they would look like at those printer lights on the print stock you choose.

thanks a lot David.it is for printing only.
is there a website or book i can refer to do this with ultimate detail.
thanks once again.
rajavel
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Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

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