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Vario-Switar 18-86 EE


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#1 Jordan Hassay

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 01:23 AM

I'm a new film student who recently purchased a camera on Ebay, and it came with a Vario-Switar 18-86 mm EE zoom lens. Naturally, there were no manuals included in the deal.

I've managed to figure out most of the easy features of the lens, where the f-stop is, etc., but one of the extra barrels they added on (for fun, I guess) I still can't figure out. It's the bottom one, and it has a small lens on the end, as well as an aperture ring that also affects a sliding chart that lines film speeds up with frame rates (I'm assuming). I have a hunch that it may be somehow related to light compensation for increasing/decreasing frame rates, but I can't be sure. Even if I guessed right, I still need advice on how to use this feature, when to use it, if I should just chop it off with a saw, all that. Also, there's a tiny silver button on the same barrel, and I have no clue what it does.

In short, please tell me everything I need to know about this part of my lens, before I do something stupid like shooting a project with it. :blink:

Use little words, and assume I know nothing at all about anything film-related. I feel that I'll learn more this way.

Thanks!

EDIT:: Camera is a Rex4 Bolex. Don't know if this is significant, but felt like adding it just to make sure.

Edited by Cinemabun, 13 March 2006 - 01:25 AM.

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#2 Mike Rizos

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:50 PM

Hi here's what I remember about that lens
The 18-86 is a great lens. The lower smaller barrel you are refering to is the automatic aperture machanism and settings. It has settings for a fully open(right) and half closed (left) shutter. Below them is the filming speed. In the middle are the ASA ratings for the film you are using. So if you are filming at 24fps with 250 ASA film align the two values and you're set. The whole front part of that small barrel unscrews counterclockwise to accept the battery, which I believe is a PX-13(not 100% sure about this).
Now on the other smaller barrel where the aperture numbers are make sure the black background is showing for auto-exposure. The white background is for manual exposure. You lift and turn to change settings.
The run button has two settings. The white circle with the black center allows full aperture viewing when pressed half-way. There is a very satisfying click to it when you do this. When pushed all the way the lens closes down for filming according to the light meter.
And the little silver button is the battery tester. When pushed the aperture indicator needle should move to about f11 or f16.

Edited by Mike Rizos, 13 March 2006 - 11:59 PM.

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#3 Jordan Hassay

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 09:53 AM

Thanks!

Anybody know for sure what battery the V-S 18-86 uses?
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