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Films with locked down shots.


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#1 peter orland

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 02:57 AM

Are there any good films that I could watch that have none, or very little camera movement in them?
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#2 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:08 AM

I don't know about entire films, but I've always beeen fond of the "morning after in the kitchen" scene at the end of The Big Night. Haven't seen it in a long time, but as I recall there's no camera movement and not a word of dialogue, and it's hits the mark perfectly.
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#3 Lars.Erik

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:29 AM

One film you must see is "Songs from the Second floor", by Roy Andersson. It's a true masterpiece. It lasts for 1hour and 40 minutes and there are two (2) shots in there where the camera is moving. The rest is locked off. See it. I love that film. Most his films are made in this way.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120263/

http://www.cdon.com/...t=904&session=1
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#4 Norbert Shieh

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:34 AM

Are there any good films that I could watch that have none, or very little camera movement in them?

Ozu's films (Early Summer, Floating Weeds, Tokyo Story) come to mind as classic examples. For more contemporary films, look into both Hou Hsiao Hsien (Cafe Lumiere, City of Sadness) and Tsia Ming-Liang (What time is it there?, Goodbye Dragon Inn) who both use composed shots without much camera movement.

Gus Van Sant's latest, Last Days, is a pretty good example too.
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#5 Mike Williamson

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:20 AM

Jim Jarmusch's "Stranger Than Paradise" is a great film where every scene plays out in single shots, most of which are static, lovely black and white as well. "Godfather 1 & 2" both have very minimal camera movement with lots of static tableau shots, plenty of amazing Gordon Willis compositions.
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#6 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:32 AM

One film you must see is "Songs from the Second floor", by Roy Andersson. It's a true masterpiece. It lasts for 1hour and 40 minutes and there are two (2) shots in there where the camera is moving. The rest is locked off. See it. I love that film. Most his films are made in this way.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120263/

http://www.cdon.com/...t=904&session=1


andersson is probably the best contemporary bonafide auteur that i know of. that film is genius.


another great film which utilizes a lot of static wides to great effect is jacques tati's playtime, a masterpiece in my opinion.
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:53 AM

Jim Jarmusch's "Stranger Than Paradise" is a great film where every scene plays out in single shots, most of which are static, lovely black and white as well. "Godfather 1 & 2" both have very minimal camera movement with lots of static tableau shots, plenty of amazing Gordon Willis compositions.


Yeah, I would suggest Stranger than Paradise as well. 1984 Black and White. I think there might have been a couple scenes later in the movie that actually were more than one shot in the scene. The movie plays really well in a theatre when one is locked in with no distractions.
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#8 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 06:36 AM

One film you must see is "Songs from the Second floor", by Roy Andersson. It's a true masterpiece. It lasts for 1hour and 40 minutes and there are two (2) shots in there where the camera is moving. The rest is locked off. See it. I love that film. Most his films are made in this way.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120263/

http://www.cdon.com/...t=904&session=1


Agree - a visual masterpiece. Did you know the whole film except one scene was shot on the 16mm lens? On
the one exception the used the 18mm.....
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#9 Dan Goulder

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:49 AM

Here's one more vote for "Stranger Than Paradise". There are actually a few pans in the movie, but a lot of people will say they don't recall any. A more recent example would be "Cache", featuring 'longer than average' fixed shots. It works.
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#10 Bob Hayes

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:07 PM

Eric Rohmer's "Pauline a la Plage". Pleasent masters where the whole scene just plays. Good little film also.
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#11 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 02:17 PM

Are there any good films that I could watch that have none, or very little camera movement in them?


If passable is okay, 'The 40 year old virgin'.

I was surprised by the lack of camera movement.

As to good, if I remember correcctly, Much of 'Seppuku' aka 'Hara Kiri' has static, very formal shots.
But at he end as the movie explodes, lots of camera movement.

---LV
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#12 peter orland

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 10:24 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I've ordered Songs From The Second Floor from the local video sales. I look forward to watching it.
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#13 Chris Keth

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:28 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I've ordered Songs From The Second Floor from the local video sales. I look forward to watching it.



Certain Kurosawa movies and parts thereof have very little to no movement. The end section of Rashomon comes to mind.
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#14 George Lekovic

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:06 AM

Look at the german "Shultze gets the blues". Not only there is no camera movement, but midway through the film when the main character decides to go on a trip camera pans for the first (and only) time and that works just great. By this very simple pan the audience that is used to static shots is thrown into discomfort to forshadow the voyage that is about to take place.

A must see. One of the better films of the last year.

Edited by George Lekovic, 14 March 2006 - 12:06 AM.

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#15 Matthew Day

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 02:16 PM

How about Lars Von Trier's 'Europa'? Not all fixed shots - a fair few dolly's - but barely a pan in sight and some brilliant work with fixed shots on a train utilising rear projection.

matt
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#16 Joe Taylor

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 07:15 PM

Oh, wow. I forgot all about "Songs from the Second Floor." Pay extra attention to the very last shot. Very long, maybe over two minutes. takes place in a land fill where they are dumping a truck load of plastic Jesus'. Then, from off in the far distance, a crowd of people slowly make their way across the desolate landscape like zombies. Very creepy. It's at the top of my Net Flix que.
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#17 Ronney Ross

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 10:28 PM

There is a Christian film shot by Dave Christiano(director) "Late One Night" would be an excellent choice the entire movie takes place in a cafe and the shot are paced between the occupants sitting in a booth and the cook standing behind the counter, never gets boring. Check it out: http://www.christianfilms.com
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