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Incident metering low key


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#1 Steve Milligan

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:17 AM

I've got my first S16 shoot coming up, and am wondering how to translate my light-by-eye/expose off the viewfinder experience to film. Below is something I did on video, I wonder if someone could help me with how I would have used an incident meter to find the proper exposure for it.

smilligan_metering_question01.jpg

If I meter from the faces toward the camera, I will be overexposing...so how much under should I go? Is there a better metering technique for this kind of scene?

Stock is Fuji 250T, destined for Telecine, shooting with Superspeeds wide open or nearly so.

Thanks!
Steve Milligan
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:27 AM

I've got my first S16 shoot coming up, and am wondering how to translate my light-by-eye/expose off the viewfinder experience to film. Below is something I did on video, I wonder if someone could help me with how I would have used an incident meter to find the proper exposure for it.

smilligan_metering_question01.jpg

If I meter from the faces toward the camera, I will be overexposing...so how much under should I go? Is there a better metering technique for this kind of scene?

Stock is Fuji 250T, destined for Telecine, shooting with Superspeeds wide open or nearly so.

Thanks!
Steve Milligan
http://www.ghostmap.com


Hi,

Meter the highlight on the faces this should be 1 to 1.5 stops over and I guess the ambiant light will be about 2 stops under.

FWIW the superspeeds are much sharper by 2-2.8 split.

Stephen
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#3 Steve Milligan

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:45 AM

Hi,

Meter the highlight on the faces this should be 1 to 1.5 stops over and I guess the ambiant light will be about 2 stops under.

FWIW the superspeeds are much sharper by 2-2.8 split.

Stephen


Many thanks Stephen, precisely what I wanted to know.

Except...if you will forgive my obtuseness, you mean aim the meter from the subject at the light to measure the 1.5 over highlight, and at the camera to measure the ambient, correct?

I'm sure I can get 2-2.8, thanks for the tip.

Steve
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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:32 PM

If you're going for a similar look in terms of film, you may want to reconsider your decisiion to shoot with 250T. That will make it harder to maintain facial detail without throwing more light on the faces. If you prefer to light that scene the same way you did with the video, then a 500T stock will probably get you closer to the look you want. You'll have more latitude in the 'underexposed' areas of the frame.
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#5 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 12:55 PM

What I would do is to meter toward the source that is 3/4 back on the left. I then would read to the camera as to make sure I am not too underexposed, considering you still want some details in the toe, from the picture you posted. It looks to me that it's like 2 stops under, (as Stephen says) but that is typically you to do that choice, since the guy's back seems to be like 3 stops under. You can also meter with a spotmeter and make sure the details in the face don't fall under may be 2 stops under the keylight (remember the skin is about 2/3 of a stop over KL)
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 01:07 PM

you mean aim the meter from the subject at the light to measure the 1.5 over highlight, and at the camera to measure the ambient, correct?

Steve


Steve,

Yes, aim the meter at the light you are reading. Shield the highlight from the meter for the ambiant.

Stephen
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#7 stoop

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 02:49 PM

If you exposed the face normally, not two stops under. Could you then bring it down in post to re-create the same look? Or Not?

Thanks
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#8 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:12 PM

Depends if you go the Di or the traditional route...

With the traditional route, it's always better to go as close as possible to the result you want, when shooting. With the DI route, I think it would be okay posing normally, and then underexpose in post, but the highlights (in the hair for instance) may be to high. Also you don't always control the post production... May be a 1 stop underexposition could be okay, but I wouldn't bother, my self and just get the look I want at the shooting, basically.
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#9 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:23 PM

If you exposed the face normally, not two stops under. Could you then bring it down in post to re-create the same look? Or Not?

Thanks


Hi,

If the face is exposed normally, the highlight is 3.5 over. A spot meter would read 4.5 over, many meople then overexpose 2/3 stop! At 5+ stops over your highlights will start blowing. The final image will not look as good IMHO.

Stephen
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