Jump to content


Photo

No Image


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:25 AM

Hi,
Shot 2 and a half rolls of Fuji 500 Negative, single perforation Winding B (emulsion in) with Arri SR III. The processing lab came back with the report that the 1/2 roll (200 ft) has no image after processing though the report stated that it had been exposed. It does not make sense, isn't it ? Please advise.
(1) The lab should be able to detect the unexposed film while rewinding into the lab processing magazine if at all the unexposed film was wrongly sent, isn't it? But the lab confirmed that it had been exposed.
(2) Was it possible the SRIII ran without exposing? If so, how?
TQ in advance.
  • 0

#2 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:36 AM

Hi,
Shot 2 and a half rolls of Fuji 500 Negative, single perforation Winding B (emulsion in) with Arri SR III. The processing lab came back with the report that the 1/2 roll (200 ft) has no image after processing though the report stated that it had been exposed. It does not make sense, isn't it ? Please advise.
(1) The lab should be able to detect the unexposed film while rewinding into the lab processing magazine if at all the unexposed film was wrongly sent, isn't it? But the lab confirmed that it had been exposed.
(2) Was it possible the SRIII ran without exposing? If so, how?
TQ in advance.


Hi,

It sounds like you are about 5 or more stops under exposed. Shutter angle, wrong ND filters or wrong T stop are probably to blame.

The lab would have no way of knowing that the film has been exposed before they develope it!

I had a client give 3 recans to a lab in Switzerland, they developed it! The cans said 400' Fuji F64 D recans!

Stephen
  • 0

#3 Dominik Muench

Dominik Muench
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 443 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Brisbane

Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:37 AM

sure you gave em the right roll ?

happened to me once, that i unloaded the film and made a shortend, which i then brough to the lab, and left the latent negative in my fridge *blushes
  • 0

#4 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:48 AM

sure you gave em the right roll ?

happened to me once, that i unloaded the film and made a shortend, which i then brough to the lab, and left the latent negative in my fridge *blushes


I am in the mid to find out whether the shortend was sent to the lab. In the mean time I would like to find out whether the lab could detect it if at all the shortend was sent. I may be wrong as I understand that if the film is exposed in the take up spool of camera, the film is in winding A. Certainly the technician will detect it while rewinding the film before processing.
  • 0

#5 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 13 March 2006 - 01:13 PM

I am in the mid to find out whether the shortend was sent to the lab. In the mean time I would like to find out whether the lab could detect it if at all the shortend was sent. I may be wrong as I understand that if the film is exposed in the take up spool of camera, the film is in winding A. Certainly the technician will detect it while rewinding the film before processing.


Hi,

Some cameras wind A some cameras wind B, my own cameras wind both A & B, so labs are used to variations, with and without cores!

Stephen
  • 0

#6 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:50 PM

Certainly the technician will detect it while rewinding the film before processing.

Rewinding the film prior to processing is carried out in total darkness, and while the edges are checked for tears, the position of the perfs isn't something the technician will look for. It makes no difference to the lab which side the perfs are on: there are no sprockets on most processing machines. There's no reason to reject film that is in A-winding position not B: there could be many reasons for this.

What the lab does have to do, is to presume that the film you sent for processing is the film you want processed. You can't blame them for that.

If you check the 1/2 roll that you have left over, you can easily tell if it's been through the camera. That would settle the question more certainly than opinion and guesswork over the internet.
  • 0

#7 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 13 March 2006 - 06:33 PM

Rewinding the film prior to processing is carried out in total darkness, and while the edges are checked for tears, the position of the perfs isn't something the technician will look for. It makes no difference to the lab which side the perfs are on: there are no sprockets on most processing machines. There's no reason to reject film that is in A-winding position not B: there could be many reasons for this.

What the lab does have to do, is to presume that the film you sent for processing is the film you want processed. You can't blame them for that.

If you check the 1/2 roll that you have left over, you can easily tell if it's been through the camera. That would settle the question more certainly than opinion and guesswork over the internet.

Hi Stephen & Dominic,
thank you very much for the info. In fact I am not trying to push the fault to the lab. After your both explainationn, I have learnt that cameras do take winding A roll and the lab is unable to identify whether the film is exposed or not. I suspect that a shortend is sent to the lab. This info is very useful for me. regards.
  • 0

#8 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:48 AM

Hi,

Some cameras wind A some cameras wind B, my own cameras wind both A & B, so labs are used to variations, with and without cores!

Stephen

regards

Stephen,
TQ. may I know the make of your camera which takes both A & B? How do you switch from Wind B to Wind A or vice versa ? Ohterwise the claw or register pin will tear the film.
  • 0

#9 Laurent Andrieux

Laurent Andrieux
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1527 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • France

Posted 14 March 2006 - 07:01 AM

The point is only to have rollers on the take up side so that you can either put the roll one way or the other, if I'm right...
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Tai Audio

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Opal

Technodolly

CineLab

Willys Widgets