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#1 George Stratford

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:49 PM

Hey guys , What is the difference between 35mm film for slr cameras and 35mm film for cinema?
sorry for the rookie question!


Coady Marshall
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 05:06 PM

Hey guys , What is the difference between 35mm film for slr cameras and 35mm film for cinema?
sorry for the rookie question!
Coady Marshall


Most obvious is that they use different perforations. Motion picture camera films are normally perforated BH-1866, still films are KS-1870.

The motion picture color negative films are designed for the ECN-2 process, which uses CD-3 and has a prebath and rem-jet removal. Still color negative films are designed for process C-41 with CD-4 developing agent, and do not have rem-jet.
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#3 George Lekovic

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 06:00 PM

Beside the difference in the type of film & emulsion, there is significant difference on how the image is layed on the film.

In still SLR cameras the image is projected sideways, meaning that the top and bottom of the frame are along perforations. In the motion picture film the frame is layed the other way (90 degree angular displacement) - it is the right and left sides of the frame that find themselves along the perforations. This results in motion picture frame being smaller that the still camera frame.

hope this makes sense.

Edited by George Lekovic, 13 March 2006 - 06:03 PM.

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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 03:54 PM

Most obvious is that they use different perforations. Motion picture camera films are normally perforated BH-1866, still films are KS-1870.

The motion picture color negative films are designed for the ECN-2 process, which uses CD-3 and has a prebath and rem-jet removal. Still color negative films are designed for process C-41 with CD-4 developing agent, and do not have rem-jet.

finaly not to mention that the motion picture negaive is slightly lower contrast than still negative. This makes for slightly washed out prints if you priint shots on MP film on regular printing papaer.

The differnce in the perfs is not an issue for most still cameras, (it would be for both movie cameras and Movie printing) but the rem-kjet on movie film can make a real mess of a C-41 processing line.

If you want to put MP film in your still camera, Dale Labs in florida still handles it as a special order. They seem to be printing digitaly so they can correct the contrast.
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#5 David Sweetman

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 04:04 PM

Beside the difference in the type of film & emulsion, there is significant difference on how the image is layed on the film.


and correct me if I'm wrong, but I think -- based on messing around with my slr -- that there is less depth of field because of the larger area of exposure with an slr.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 12:23 PM

and correct me if I'm wrong, but I think -- based on messing around with my slr -- that there is less depth of field because of the larger area of exposure with an slr.


Correct. Also, the double area of a still frame (unless we're talking about the few movies or FX shot with "lazy 8" 8 perf film running sideways) has the effect of meaning that 50mm is the normal for 35mm stills, whereas I think it's ~35-40 for a cine prime.

Regards.

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#7 Mark Dunn

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Posted 21 March 2006 - 06:08 AM

Twenty years or so ago there was a company offering 35mm. cine film cut into still camera loads, processed and returned with prints or slides. It never really caught on, presumably because of some of the problems mentioned above. I bet more than a few C-41 labs got them by accident and ended up with remjet-clogged machines.
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 21 March 2006 - 07:31 AM

Twenty years or so ago there was a company offering 35mm. cine film cut into still camera loads, processed and returned with prints or slides. It never really caught on, presumably because of some of the problems mentioned above. I bet more than a few C-41 labs got them by accident and ended up with remjet-clogged machines.


Dale Labs in Florida still offers this service. RGB in Cali was also offering something similar until recently.

Regards.

~Karl
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