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Wondering about my light meter


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#1 Ronney Ross

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 10:18 PM

meter.jpg

Sorry but I couldn't get a focused shot with my camera. But I have an old Sekonic L-6 incident meter I got off ebay. It has two manual dials that have the calculations of exposure times and fstops. It didn't come with a manual so I am trying to make sure I am using it correctly. Once you get your reading and you set the top the dial (fstops) to mark based the reading you get theres a section that give a "light value".

The thing I am concerned about is this how you determine your lighting ratio for a particular setup.
For example I shot a test roll of 7265 Super 8 today and got a reading of about f8+ =light a value of 14 (facing the meter to the open sky) and then metered in the the shade facing a somewhat different angle to get a fstop reading of f5.6, lightvalue =11.5-12.

I wasn't sure so just subtracting 14-12 I was thinking this would be like a 2:1 setup but wasn't sure. I shot just about everything each at f5.6, 8, 11. just to bracket will post pics once processed. Anyone ever used this before please give advice.

-Ronney Ross
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#2 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:31 PM

A full stop is twice as much light, so f8:f5.6 is 2:1
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 11:41 PM

I've never used that particular Sekonic analog meter, but I've used the Studio De-Luxe and it's probably the same dial setup. What you want to do is stand in the subject's position and point the white dome on the meter toward the camera and press the needle release for a moment then release the button. This direct reading should be a footcandle reading.

Now you want to turn the dial to that the ASA (which is the same thing as ISO and EI) of your film is showing through the little window. Now turn the dial (both of the nested dials together, actually)so that the arrow points to the same numerical reading that the needle is pointing to. Now there are a sequence of shutter speeds and f-stops lined up. You simply choose one combination of lined up settings, set them, and shoot. Since you are shooting motion, you will have a fixed shutter speed of either 1/48th second for 24fps (frame per second) or 1/36th of a second for 18 fps.

If your meter doesn't have a white dome, you will do everything the same except you will stand at the camera and point the meter's sensor in the subject's direction.

Edit- about the meter's 'light values'. I would ignore them entirely and work only in stops. Not all companies use(d) the same system for their arbitrary numbers. It's simpler and eliminates the accident where you're talking in your meter's 'light values' and someone else thinks you mean his meter's 'light values' and does something wrong.

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 13 March 2006 - 11:44 PM.

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