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need suggestion in lighting for big sets


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#1 P S Manushpsnandan

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:10 AM

hai :)
iam from india and our next project is a huge one where we are going to create a set of a huge town inside a studio,the whole film is going to be shot only inside the sets and the entire film is night effect,in india we are not used in working with such huge sets,so i need suggstions about how i should go on with my lighting for the entire set and also need references of films with the same kind of setup,pls also let me know about what all kind of lights(tungsten)can be used to light up huge sets.we are planning to keep a low key look for the entire film , iam awaiting replies according to my above told needs
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 05:29 AM

hai :)
iam from india and our next project is a huge one where we are going to create a set of a huge town inside a studio,the whole film is going to be shot only inside the sets and the entire film is night effect,in india we are not used in working with such huge sets,so i need suggstions about how i should go on with my lighting for the entire set and also need references of films with the same kind of setup,pls also let me know about what all kind of lights(tungsten)can be used to light up huge sets.we are planning to keep a low key look for the entire film , iam awaiting replies according to my above told needs


Big sets are really no different than small ones, but they can be daunting. I'm no expert in big sets myself, but I just recently had to do something similar. Just light it one piece at a time and expand it until you've lit the whole set. Try to keep it small in your head and have a battle plan and you'll be fine.
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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 06:03 AM

My advice would be to look at back issues of American Cinematographer, and see how some of the big sets featured there are lit, then adapt those approaches to your own film/budget.
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#4 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 01:52 PM

I agree with Adam. There is no difference between big or small spaces. Just light it one piece at a time but make sure that you give yourself enough time to do so.
Hop this helps
Mario Concepcion Jackson
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#5 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 04:29 PM

Other than similar responces, make it look good only there's more of it.

Think about making the area easier to get units and power where you will need it. Drop catwalks if the studio doesn't have a walk on grid. Get as much pre-rigging done before the shoot as possible. I like to have most of the heavy lifting done before the set is finished and dressed as it may be difficult to get units hung where you need them later. Work closely with the set designer to be sure he has considered your needs. Anticipation will help avoid on-set lighting delays.
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#6 Bob Hayes

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 07:28 PM

I?d need to know more to be able to give much input. Does the area have lots of practical lighting like street lights, shop lights, and lit signs? Or is it dark and after hours. Do you plan on shooting in small areas or do you see a lot in your shots. Perhaps there are Steadicam shots through the town or 360 degree shots. Generally I?d try to rough in as much of the set as possible. Initially I?d think space lights for a general ambient fill, larger units at the ends of streets pointing back into the set, and lights inside the buildings. Wiring the practicals alone can be a huge job. If your money is tight practical lights like strings of bare bulbs can do a lot of the work.
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#7 P S Manushpsnandan

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 01:42 AM

I?d need to know more to be able to give much input. Does the area have lots of practical lighting like street lights, shop lights, and lit signs? Or is it dark and after hours. Do you plan on shooting in small areas or do you see a lot in your shots. Perhaps there are Steadicam shots through the town or 360 degree shots. Generally I?d try to rough in as much of the set as possible. Initially I?d think space lights for a general ambient fill, larger units at the ends of streets pointing back into the set, and lights inside the buildings. Wiring the practicals alone can be a huge job. If your money is tight practical lights like strings of bare bulbs can do a lot of the work.



hai :)
thanks every one who had given me the inputs,as bob quoted we already had the idea of using space lights for the ambience,we will have a lot of steadicam shots and 360degree shots and the film is basically a musical subject where we want to give a fairy tale look to it just like moulinrouge or chicago and so i want to observe more films in that genre, i would be happy if anyone could give me the names of such films and also the kind of lighting pattern they have used in detail
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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 02:55 PM

hai :)
thanks every one who had given me the inputs,as bob quoted we already had the idea of using space lights for the ambience,we will have a lot of steadicam shots and 360degree shots and the film is basically a musical subject where we want to give a fairy tale look to it just like moulinrouge or chicago and so i want to observe more films in that genre, i would be happy if anyone could give me the names of such films and also the kind of lighting pattern they have used in detail



Well, the beauty of that kind of subject for a DP is that the light doesn't always ahve to be motivated. There is generally more room for light to make things pretty, even when it's not motivated.
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