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Shooting digital to simulate Super 8


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#1 Daniel Tan

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 03:48 PM

Hi there,

I'm trying to decide whether to shoot some day scenes in Super 8 or just shoot it digitally (DVX100 interlaced) and simulate the Super8 look in post. These scenes(flashbacks) are meant to match with the rest of the film that was shot in Super16. The final format is going to be on DVD and BetaSP. There's a chance that this might be projected in a theatre using DVD or Betasp.

I guess resolution wise, film is still better than digital, is it? Also there are two concerns here. Cost and more so on the types of shots that I have. Most of them are going to be panning shots. One of them will be shooting from inside the moving car looking and passing a boy standing on the sidewalk. Particularly, I'm wondering about the post-film look with this types of shots.

Anybody has experience or footages that was shot digitally but look super8 after post? I've access to cinelook in Aftereffects.

Thanks for any advise.

Daniel

Edited by Daniel Tan, 14 March 2006 - 03:51 PM.

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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 03:57 PM

Hi there,

I'm trying to decide whether to shoot some day scenes in Super 8 or just shoot it digitally (DVX100 interlaced) and simulate the Super8 look in post. These scenes(flashbacks) are meant to match with the rest of the film that was shot in Super16. The final format is going to be on DVD and BetaSP. There are two concerns here. Cost and more so on the types of shots that I have. Most of them are going to be panning shots. One of them will be shooting from inside the moving car looking and passing a boy standing on the sidewalk. Particularly, I'm wondering about the post-film look with this types of shots.

Anybody has experience or footages that was shot digitally but look super8 after post? I've access to cinelook in Aftereffects.

Thanks for any advise.

Daniel



The interlaced video footage is very likely to look just like that -- interlaced video intercut with higher quality Super-16 film. For a "Super-8" look with the equipment you have, consider composing for a Super-8 sized 4:3 aspect ratio in the center of the Super-16 frame and extracting that smaller image when you transfer. That will give you the increased magnification of graininess and unsteadiness, and an image that is more like Super-8 for image structure. If you are seeking a "home movie" look for the flashbacks, hand hold the camera and do things an amateur home movie maker might do like fast pans or excessive use of a zoom. I've always disliked "faked" dirt and scratches that call attention to themselves by their excessiveness.
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#3 Filip Plesha

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 04:06 PM

super8 has higher resolution than SD video, but still video will probably look sharper, possibly too sharp for super8 look.

Depending on to whom you are trying to "sell" that super8 look, it may or may not work, but you will never sell it to anyone who has ever shot or seen super8 projected, and many current grownups still have memories of super8.

Since super8 "look" is mostly tied to Kodachrome, emulating it would be nearly impossible, because
its very difficult to emulate Kodachrome even with new negative super8 film, and you can't even emulate that with video, much less super8 Kodachrome.

But like I said, depends on who you will be seeing it to.
You may get people to recognize that you were trying to emulate a super8 look, and if you ask me that's pretty lame, its like making a subtitle below the image saying: "this is supose to look like super8 so imagine it is super8"

The cool thing would be to make them realise that they really are watching super8






I've always disliked "faked" dirt and scratches that call attention to themselves by their excessiveness.


yea, just take your film, throw it on the floor and step on it a few times, that will be authentic :D
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 04:28 PM

Since super8 "look" is mostly tied to Kodachrome, emulating it would be nearly impossible, because
its very difficult to emulate Kodachrome


Lots of home movies were shot on EKTACHROME films during the 1970's and 1980's. I certainly shot a mix of films, that included both KODACHROME and EKTACHROME films.

7285 can come very close to emulating the "look" of KODACHROME film, especially when transferred to video. You could also make a print of the negative, and transfer that to help get a pseudo-reversal look.
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#5 Filip Plesha

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 05:49 PM

7285 can come very close to emulating the "look" of KODACHROME film, especially when transferred to video. You could also make a print of the negative, and transfer that to help get a pseudo-reversal look.


7285 has too many decades of technology development in it to look like Kodachrome. Plus I think its a bit too saturated for a Kodachrome look (which has somewhat more subtle color pallete, exept for the bleeding reds)
but that's adjustable

With film "progress" may not be linear and well defined as it is with digital electronics. One mans
garbage is another mans treasure.

I know I'd be happy to get my hands on some old Vericolor, while some people couldn't be happier to throw it away for more modern looking Supra films and such..
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