Jump to content


Photo

Your trhught on Brazil.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 15 March 2006 - 09:23 PM

I just saw Barzil yesterday for the first time, which is one of those gaps in my cinematic education I've been meaning to fill for a while now. I found it incredible in it's vision, actually much more interesting than say A Tim Berton or David Chonanberg movie, visually speaking and much more conventionall in structure than I was lead to believe it would be. I also found it depressing in it's storyline but well done. I know this film is old but what does everyone else think of it?
  • 0

#2 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 16 March 2006 - 02:47 PM

I just saw Barzil yesterday for the first time, which is one of those gaps in my cinematic education I've been meaning to fill for a while now. I found it incredible in it's vision, actually much more interesting than say A Tim Berton or David Chonanberg movie, visually speaking and much more conventionall in structure than I was lead to believe it would be. I also found it depressing in it's storyline but well done. I know this film is old but what does everyone else think of it?


Your keyboard seems a bit topsy turvey! ;)

Brazil is an amazing film. I don't think you could even compare it to Tim Burton because his work seems so far away from Brazil. As far as David Cronenberg goes, he is very different too. I guess Naked Lunch might be seen as the closest to Brazil in a strange way that I can't put my finger on. Of the films I've seen by him my favourites are Naked Lunch, Videodrome, Stereo and Crimes of the future, which I think are all wonderful films in their own way.

The structure is fairly conventional tho I think you are right, however people seem to get very freaked out by films that are even a bit different in structure, or just don't follow the rules. I was on a film studies course once where everyone was trying to tell me that "Lost Highway" was impossible to understand and made no sense whatsoever. It was just too subtle for them I think. They weren't stupid people or anything, they just couldn't deal with the fact that the film was different. People don't like it when things are different mostly.

Brazil is probably much like that too I expect. It's a lot like the trial by Franz Capra I guess. I don't know what to say about Brazil. It is Terry's masterpiece. I love 12 Monkeys and well, quite a few other films by him, but Brazil is one of those films, where everything comes together. I think it really is a great film, in the sense that Woody Allen talks about great films. The sets and cinematography and the story are all just so special. Wonderful.

I've been looking forward to his film "Tideland" for ages, but it never seems to come out. I don't know what's wrong. I thnk it has been finished for a long time now. :(

love

Freya
  • 0

#3 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 17 March 2006 - 02:03 PM

I love Brazil.

Kinda depressing, yeah. I thought of it as a modern day "Orwell's 1984" type of story, with some really, really dark humor.

Like how the guy's mom keeps bragging that he's gotten a promotion at work, to "information retrieval".
Then you find out that "Information Retrieval" is a job where he tortures people to get information out of them.

Great film.

MP
  • 0

#4 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 21 March 2006 - 12:17 AM

It makes me really feel lost that Don Quixote fell apart. Johnny depp and Terry seem like a match made in Heaven. I haven't see lost in La mancha yet but am looking forward to it. One of the greatest films ever made in my opinion was Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I can also see the parellels drawn between Terry and David Lynch, which is where I was going with Cronenberg and Burton. They all seem to fall into the mainstream avantguard that I would also put John Waters and even Coppolla in some respects into (One From the Heart and Apacalypse Now-his cut). I suppose you could put Harmony Karrine into that league as well.

Edited by Capt.Video, 21 March 2006 - 12:19 AM.

  • 0

#5 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 21 March 2006 - 12:31 AM

Watch it again.

It's so dense, multi-layered and multi-dimensional that you'll miss a great portion of it on your first viewing.

I think the real triumph of Brazil is the way it used the unique FORM of film to convey its ideas. Not only did it cross-polenate genres and styles, but it referenced and mixed art forms (literature, cinema, opera, among many others) in a way that no other art form could. Brazil could not have been a book or play and still have conveyed the same ideas and themes.

SO much of what's on the screen in Brazil is a reference to another artwork, that you have to brush up on your larger awareness of art to be able to appreciate the way those references contribute to the message.

"We're all in this together, kid." ;-)
  • 0

#6 Peter J DeCrescenzo

Peter J DeCrescenzo
  • Sustaining Members
  • 620 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Portland, OR, USA www.peterdv.com Blog: http://herefortheweather.wordpress.com/

Posted 28 March 2006 - 05:42 PM

"Brazil" is my all-time favorite film. Not only do I think the film is brilliant, as an admitted tech-nerd and semi-hopeless romantic, I strongly identify with the film's central character. I share the socio-political views expressed in the film 100% -- it's uncanny how accurately it predicts what will come to pass in the years since its release. "Brazil" is also funny and entertaining.

IMHO: 10 out of 10 stars.

"Report a friend!"
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

The Slider

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Glidecam