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Shooting night with 7251


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#1 Jan Weis

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 01:18 PM

I'm planning to shoot some test shots at night with some good old Ektachrome 7251 high speed reversal film (ASA 400) which has long been discontinued. Anyways I'm new to 16mm filmmaking and I'm not sure if I should set the film at ASA 400 while filmming or more/less.

Can anybody help me out?

thanks

//Jan
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#2 Paul Mattei

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 01:34 PM

<_< What type of camera are you using? I would suggest using a good light meter to help determine apperture settings and shutter angle. You may need to push this film depending on available light. Good luck!

Paul Mattei
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#3 Jan Weis

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 01:48 PM

<_< What type of camera are you using? I would suggest using a good light meter to help determine apperture settings and shutter angle. You may need to push this film depending on available light. Good luck!

Paul Mattei



Hi Paul,

I'm using a Beaulieu R16 and I do have an external light meter (just remembered) at hand so hopefully itll turn out alright... But the question remains should I keep it 400 ASA or should I overxpose the film?


//Jan
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 01:58 PM

Hi Paul,

I'm using a Beaulieu R16 and I do have an external light meter (just remembered) at hand so hopefully itll turn out alright... But the question remains should I keep it 400 ASA or should I overxpose the film?
//Jan


With old color negative film, overexposure is usually the way to go. But with reversal, age will generally make the blacks more "milky", so overexposure could worsen the situation, despite the fact you are likely losing some speed and contrast with age.
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#5 Paul Mattei

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 02:01 PM

Hi Paul,

I'm using a Beaulieu R16 and I do have an external light meter (just remembered) at hand so hopefully itll turn out alright... But the question remains should I keep it 400 ASA or should I overxpose the film?
//Jan


There are probably more experienced cinematographers than I that could give you advise, but it sounds like by setting the camera at 400 ASA, you are using the camera's light meter. It's all realative. The camera can only open the aperature so wide, so even if you set the film speed slower, you only expose the film so much. By pushing the film during the processing to say 800 ASA, you might have more latitude. Are you using any lights? The light meter will tell you everything. Use the manual mode on the camera.

Paul
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#6 Freya Black

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 02:25 PM

I think people are not sure if you mean you are worried about shooting at night or are worried about the age of the film. Judging from the fact you are talking about overexposure I assume you mean that you are worried that the film is ancient. Sadly as it is reversal it is probably not a good idea to try the overexposure trick, because, well the film will look a bit overexposed. Reversal doesn't like being overexposed. It's not too keen on being underexposed either, it's a bit fussy. I think you should try and get the exposure bang on. People often try to underexpose reversal slightly, but given the age, it would be good to get it right on the nail.

As far as it being too dark, maybe you could bring a really powerful lantern with you! ;)

love

Freya
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#7 Jan Weis

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 03:35 PM

I think people are not sure if you mean you are worried about shooting at night or are worried about the age of the film. Judging from the fact you are talking about overexposure I assume you mean that you are worried that the film is ancient. Sadly as it is reversal it is probably not a good idea to try the overexposure trick, because, well the film will look a bit overexposed. Reversal doesn't like being overexposed. It's not too keen on being underexposed either, it's a bit fussy. I think you should try and get the exposure bang on. People often try to underexpose reversal slightly, but given the age, it would be good to get it right on the nail.

As far as it being too dark, maybe you could bring a really powerful lantern with you! ;)

love

Freya



Sorry if I have been unclear but yes Freya, you understand exactly what I mean. So Ill do just as you say: get the exposure right

Thanks Freya :D
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#8 Jan Weis

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 03:49 PM

There are probably more experienced cinematographers than I that could give you advise, but it sounds like by setting the camera at 400 ASA, you are using the camera's light meter. It's all realative. The camera can only open the aperature so wide, so even if you set the film speed slower, you only expose the film so much. By pushing the film during the processing to say 800 ASA, you might have more latitude. Are you using any lights? The light meter will tell you everything. Use the manual mode on the camera.

Paul


The only lights I will have is the freeway lamps,cars and the moon. What I plan shooting is generally just a test shot for shooting at night and since I have high speed film I thought i'd give it a try. Trusting the light meter completly sounds like the right way to go.

Thanks Paul


// Jan

Edited by ozzball, 16 March 2006 - 03:50 PM.

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