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7278 Tri-X daylight exposure


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#1 Fernando Morales

Fernando Morales
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Posted 17 March 2006 - 05:04 PM

Hi, everybody!

I've recently purchased a lot of 14 old tri-x cartridges (really cheap) just to mess around with home processing. The question is: is it enough with de CCA filter of the camera to expose film en daylight or do I have to put a filter on it?

I have 3 super 8 cameras:

- Canon 514XL
- Canon 814AZe
- Canon 814XL-e

Excuse me for my rookieness, I am just starting.

Thanks and best regards,

Morales
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 March 2006 - 07:50 PM

Hi, everybody!

I've recently purchased a lot of 14 old tri-x cartridges (really cheap) just to mess around with home processing. The question is: is it enough with de CCA filter of the camera to expose film en daylight or do I have to put a filter on it?

I have 3 super 8 cameras:

- Canon 514XL
- Canon 814AZe
- Canon 814XL-e

Excuse me for my rookieness, I am just starting.

Thanks and best regards,

Morales


If I understand correctly I think what you are concerned about is the high enough sensitivity of your tri-x will cause your f-stop to be near f-16/22 when shooting outdoors and perhaps you want to lower it a bit. The Canon 1014XL-S, one heck of a camera, has a shutter setting of 220 degrees and also a setting for 150 degrees, stick with the 150 degree setting. Also shoot at 24 FPS, that will slightly help dip your f-stop as well. However, you probably will need an Nd filter of one f-stop at least if you are shooting outdoors during the mid-day sun, unless you are shooting into shadowy areas, then the Tri-x should be fine without an ND filter.

The bigger the Nd number, the harder it will be to see your subject via the viewfinder, so even though you could get away with a 2f-stop or 3f-stop filter, you probably want to stick with a 1s-stop filter. A polarizer might be fun to use as well, although you may notice what it does moreso with color film.
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#3 Fernando Morales

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Posted 21 March 2006 - 08:03 PM

[quote name='Alessandro Machi' date='Mar 22 2006, 01:50 AM' post='96983']

Thank you, Alex! Really useful.
By the way, Canon (and japanese period) cameras may not have had a lot of features like other brands, but, man, they've been build like tanks! Mine never been at a repair store and still working fine! Just put new batteries and the go!

Best regards,

Morales
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