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Superman shot anyone?


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#1 dkingfilms

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 02:21 AM

Has anyone shot an actor to appear flying without having that person actually fly? And with no ropes?

How about ghetto style with the green screen? If so, how?

:ph34r: (I saw ghetto style cuz my school's green screen isn't even the proper green color and is extremely dirty. Mind you, I'm appreciative that we have one but geez, make it the right color green!)

Ok, done with my rambling. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks! :D

Edited by dkingfilms, 19 March 2006 - 02:25 AM.

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#2 Josh Hill

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 01:21 PM

I'm really more curious how you shoot superman with someone who actually flies.
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#3 Mitch Gross

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 04:23 PM

I did a poor-man's version once for a dream scene where we placed the actor in a rock climbing harness around his waist and then used a rope to lean him very far forward off a platform while I shot from below. Above was just blue sky and with a bit of false wind the effect worked well for a short shot.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 05:09 PM

Back in my Super-8 student days, I shot some distant flying shots with a G.I.Joe-type doll sliding down some fishing line, framed against the sky. Was actually pretty believable...
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#5 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 05:19 PM

Back in my Super-8 student days, I shot some distant flying shots with a G.I.Joe-type doll sliding down some fishing line, framed against the sky. Was actually pretty believable...


I would so love to see that.

Do you ever watch any of your super 8 films, to see how you have developed.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 05:25 PM

Not in awhile. My S8 projector was destroyed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake and never replaced. A few movies were transferred cheaply to VHS before that, but I'm afraid to even try and look at those old tapes.
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#7 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 05:32 PM

Not in awhile. My S8 projector was destroyed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake and never replaced. A few movies were transferred cheaply to VHS before that, but I'm afraid to even try and look at those old tapes.


It was a period that seved its purpose perhaps?
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#8 David Sweetman

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 05:46 PM

Here's one example:

http://www.vincetoto...orldsfinest.htm

what they did is they had a rig attached to a vehicle, which was basically two horizontal metal bars that they had 'Superman' put his legs through and hold himself up by. That's one creative way to get it in-camera.

Hahaha, and I just remembered a very old movie I made where we used a guy laying on a wheelbarrow. whatever works. In fact, it wouldn't be too hard to somehow elevate the talent from the wheelbarow a bit, as they did in the above mentioned "world's finest," and pull it with a rope to get a similar effect.
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#9 dkingfilms

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 09:48 PM

Here's one example:

http://www.vincetoto...orldsfinest.htm

what they did is they had a rig attached to a vehicle, which was basically two horizontal metal bars that they had 'Superman' put his legs through and hold himself up by. That's one creative way to get it in-camera.

Hahaha, and I just remembered a very old movie I made where we used a guy laying on a wheelbarrow. whatever works. In fact, it wouldn't be too hard to somehow elevate the talent from the wheelbarow a bit, as they did in the above mentioned "world's finest," and pull it with a rope to get a similar effect.


Ok wait, how did you use the wheelbarrow? How did leaning against the wheelbarrow create that effect? Was the wheelbarrow tipped?
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#10 David Sweetman

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 11:53 PM

Ok wait, how did you use the wheelbarrow? How did leaning against the wheelbarrow create that effect? Was the wheelbarrow tipped?


The actor just laid on top of it. fairly simple...no trick to it...you just lay on top of a wheelbarow.

Now with this method, pretty much whatever you do is gonna come out cheezy-looking. But it can be done cheezily well, think Sam Raimi.

If you fixed some sort of stilt to the front end of the wheelbarow, the actor could be elevated off the wheelbarow a bit, which would make it easier to cheat the shot. Also, I'd advise shooting in a widescreen format or cropping to a widescreen format, to make it easier to frame out the wheelbarow. And of course take the shot from a lower angle.

Depending on how fast you accelerate the wheelbarrow, you may want to lock off the steering mechanism, and make provision for the actor to ditch & roll easily if he has to...uh, safety first
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