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28fps


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#1 Anastasia

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 08:49 AM

Hi guys,
I've been asked to get a reference of what it might look like when something is shot slightly faster than normal - at 28 fps. Where can I possibly find an example of that - somebody walking for instance shot at that speed.
thank you for any suggestions.
cheers,
ana
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#2 Ian Marks

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 05:44 PM

Ana, I think someone is pulling your leg with their request. The two "normal" speeds are 24 fps or 30 (nominally) fps. The difference between 24 and 28 or 30 and 28 will be barely noticeable. Motion will most likely appear "normal-ish," although it will in fact be slightly slowed down or speeded up. I think you'd have to go to about 32 fps, assuming you're projecting at 24 fps, to get a discernably languid look to your motion. To my knowledge, there's no internet resource where you'd be able to find examples of footage shot at these speeds.
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 12:19 AM

The result of off-speed shooting is totally dependent on the action being captured. In general, the faster the action is in real time, the more dramatic the effect of overcranking.

There is a discernable "languid" quality to 30fps motion (at least human motion), just a little dreamlike without appearing overtly slo-mo. But the difference between 28 and 30 fps I don't think would be distinguishable.

It's usually easier and safer to shoot 30fps when dealing with 60Hz. power, but many cameras will allow you to dial in any specific frame rate you want. It's just easier and simpler to stick with the more "common" off-speeds.
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#4 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 02:00 AM

28fps would probably be useful if you needed to slow something down, without having the viewer be consciously aware that it's anything other than normal real-world speed. an example would be to shoot an object fall and float down, while trying to create the illusion that it's lighter than it actually is.

martial arts fight sequences often use the inverse principal and shoot at 22fps. in some older, lower budget hong kong films, you can see the obvious "fast-mo" shots where they would shoot at what seems like 19 or 20fps.

hope this helps,
jaan
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 10:55 AM

Ana, I think someone is pulling your leg with their request. The two "normal" speeds are 24 fps or 30 (nominally) fps. The difference between 24 and 28 or 30 and 28 will be barely noticeable. Motion will most likely appear "normal-ish," although it will in fact be slightly slowed down or speeded up. I think you'd have to go to about 32 fps, assuming you're projecting at 24 fps, to get a discernably languid look to your motion. To my knowledge, there's no internet resource where you'd be able to find examples of footage shot at these speeds.


Hi,

I have done tests using 18,20,22,24,26,28,30,32. You do see a difference of 2 FPS, its subtle but there,I would recommend you test.

Stephen
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 01:43 PM

Hi,

I have done tests using 18,20,22,24,26,28,30,32. You do see a difference of 2 FPS, its subtle but there,I would recommend you test.

Stephen

That's kind of what I was thinking, 28 FPS shot and then projected at 24 would give normal walking, etc. a slight floating on air look to it. Do you agree?

Edmond, OK
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 01:50 PM

That's kind of what I was thinking, 28 FPS shot and then projected at 24 would give normal walking, etc. a slight floating on air look to it. Do you agree?

Edmond, OK


Hi,

Yes, if the scene is more than a couple of seconds.

Stephen
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#8 Mike Rizos

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 08:13 PM

That's kind of what I was thinking, 28 FPS shot and then projected at 24 would give normal walking, etc. a slight floating on air look to it. Do you agree?

Edmond, OK


Hi.
There is some shots in the film Serendipity where the characters seem to float. They were shot around 28fps.
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