Jump to content


Photo

Pull Processing for effect


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Jason Eitelbach

Jason Eitelbach
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Student

Posted 23 March 2006 - 01:42 PM

Hi all,

I'm shooting a western in May and my director wants a faded look for many of our exteriors. Could I acheive this look by pulling the film 1 to 2 stops.

I've never really done much pulling and I'm curious about the look. We'll be shooting mostly 5218. We want grain and a lower to medium contrast.

thanks,
je
  • 0

#2 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 23 March 2006 - 02:36 PM

Hi all,

I'm shooting a western in May and my director wants a faded look for many of our exteriors. Could I acheive this look by pulling the film 1 to 2 stops.

I've never really done much pulling and I'm curious about the look. We'll be shooting mostly 5218. We want grain and a lower to medium contrast.

thanks,
je


If "faded" means lower in contrast, certainly a pull process is in that direction. Pull-1 is fairly common. Pull-2 you need to be careful that the "tail end" chemicals and washes don't get too short as the lab speeds up the machine. Consider the Kodak VISION2 Expression 500T Color Negative Film 5229 as well, if the grain of a higher speed stock is not an issue. Lighting and filtration likewise are important to the "look" you want.

Check out the DVD commentaries and articles on some of the westerns you want to emulate for "look":

http://www.sfgate.co...8/18/DD1139.DTL

http://www.dvdtalk.c...6spaghetti.html

http://www.thecinema...nce-kid-dvd.htm

http://www.amctv.com...100-1--0-13-EST
  • 0

#3 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 23 March 2006 - 05:48 PM

Most labs will pull one stop but no more, for the reason that John gives (speeding up the machine for a shorter development time leads to too-short bleach, fix or wash times).

Have you thought about preflashing the negative? This will have the effect of lightening shadows and reducing colour saturation. You can achieve flashing by running the neg through the camera aimed at an out-of-focus white or grey card, under-exposed by about 4 stops (more or less, depending on the efect you want - test, test, test!).

Did I say test?
  • 0

#4 Luke Prendergast

Luke Prendergast
  • Sustaining Members
  • 491 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Victoria Australia

Posted 23 March 2006 - 11:14 PM

You can achieve flashing by running the neg through the camera aimed at an out-of-focus white or grey card


But you need to make sure you rethread the camera so the flash isn't out by a perf or two with respect to the frame.
  • 0


Glidecam

Abel Cine

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Technodolly

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products